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Vitamin supplement use in a low-risk population of US male physicians and subsequent cardiovascular mortality.
Arch Intern Med 2002; 162(13):1472-6AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although basic research suggests that vitamins may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the data from cohort studies and clinical trials are inconclusive.

METHODS

This prospective cohort study was conducted among 83 639 male physicians residing in the United States who had no history of CVD or cancer. At baseline, data on use of vitamin E, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and multivitamin supplements were provided by a self-administered questionnaire. Mortality from CVD and coronary heart disease (CHD) was assessed by death certificate review.

RESULTS

Use of supplements was reported by 29% of the participants. During a mean follow-up of 5.5 years, 1037 CVD deaths occurred, including 608 CHD deaths. After adjustment for several cardiovascular risk factors, supplement use was not significantly associated with total CVD or CHD mortality. For vitamin E use, the relative risks (RRs) were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-1.21) for total CVD mortality and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.61-1.27) for CHD mortality; for use of vitamin C, the RRs were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.70-1.12) for total CVD mortality and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.63-1.18) for CHD mortality; and for use of multivitamin supplements, the RRs were 1.07 (95% CI, 0.91-1.25) for total CVD mortality and 1.02 (95% CI, 0.83-1.25) for CHD mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large cohort of apparently healthy US male physicians, self-selected supplementation with vitamin E, vitamin C, or multivitamins was not associated with a significant decrease in total CVD or CHD mortality. Data from ongoing large randomized trials will be necessary to definitely establish small potential benefits of vitamin supplements on subsequent cardiovascular risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12090883

Citation

Muntwyler, Jorg, et al. "Vitamin Supplement Use in a Low-risk Population of US Male Physicians and Subsequent Cardiovascular Mortality." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 162, no. 13, 2002, pp. 1472-6.
Muntwyler J, Hennekens CH, Manson JE, et al. Vitamin supplement use in a low-risk population of US male physicians and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Arch Intern Med. 2002;162(13):1472-6.
Muntwyler, J., Hennekens, C. H., Manson, J. E., Buring, J. E., & Gaziano, J. M. (2002). Vitamin supplement use in a low-risk population of US male physicians and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Archives of Internal Medicine, 162(13), pp. 1472-6.
Muntwyler J, et al. Vitamin Supplement Use in a Low-risk Population of US Male Physicians and Subsequent Cardiovascular Mortality. Arch Intern Med. 2002 Jul 8;162(13):1472-6. PubMed PMID: 12090883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin supplement use in a low-risk population of US male physicians and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. AU - Muntwyler,Jorg, AU - Hennekens,Charles H, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Gaziano,J Michael, PY - 2002/7/2/pubmed PY - 2002/7/18/medline PY - 2002/7/2/entrez SP - 1472 EP - 6 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 162 IS - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although basic research suggests that vitamins may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the data from cohort studies and clinical trials are inconclusive. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was conducted among 83 639 male physicians residing in the United States who had no history of CVD or cancer. At baseline, data on use of vitamin E, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and multivitamin supplements were provided by a self-administered questionnaire. Mortality from CVD and coronary heart disease (CHD) was assessed by death certificate review. RESULTS: Use of supplements was reported by 29% of the participants. During a mean follow-up of 5.5 years, 1037 CVD deaths occurred, including 608 CHD deaths. After adjustment for several cardiovascular risk factors, supplement use was not significantly associated with total CVD or CHD mortality. For vitamin E use, the relative risks (RRs) were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-1.21) for total CVD mortality and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.61-1.27) for CHD mortality; for use of vitamin C, the RRs were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.70-1.12) for total CVD mortality and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.63-1.18) for CHD mortality; and for use of multivitamin supplements, the RRs were 1.07 (95% CI, 0.91-1.25) for total CVD mortality and 1.02 (95% CI, 0.83-1.25) for CHD mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of apparently healthy US male physicians, self-selected supplementation with vitamin E, vitamin C, or multivitamins was not associated with a significant decrease in total CVD or CHD mortality. Data from ongoing large randomized trials will be necessary to definitely establish small potential benefits of vitamin supplements on subsequent cardiovascular risk. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12090883/Vitamin_supplement_use_in_a_low_risk_population_of_US_male_physicians_and_subsequent_cardiovascular_mortality_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/162/pg/1472 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -