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Antihypertensive persistence and drug class.
Can J Cardiol 2002; 18(6):649-56CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Noncompliance with antihypertensive therapy is a major problem that hinders successful hypertension management.

OBJECTIVE

To study antihypertensive drug persistence for hypertensive patients in routine clinical settings.

METHODS

Hypertensive patients were retrospectively studied (1994 through 1998) using databases managed by Saskatchewan Health. The study population (46,458 people) included all patients with an International Classification of Diseases-9 code of 401, 402, 403 or 404, or any four-digit code included in these categories, who received at least one antihypertensive therapy prescription during the first 4.5 years of the study and received no antihypertensive therapy 12 months before the dispensing of the first therapy. Prescriptions were placed into the following drug classes: angiotensin II antagonists, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and diuretics. Persistence was determined for four intervals in the patient's therapy at 180, 360, 540 and 720 days.

RESULTS

Drug class had a statistically significant (P<0.001) effect on persistence. Angiotensin II antagonists had the highest persistence followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers and diuretics. Persistence decreased as the time interval increased. Females were significantly more persistent than males (P<0.005), and elderly patients were significantly more persistent than younger patients (P<0.001) at each of the four time intervals. For angiotensin II antagonists, age and sex did not affect persistence.

CONCLUSIONS

The consistently higher persistence associated with the use of angiotensin II antagonists may improve the management of hypertension.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Merck Frosst Canada Ltd, Kirkland, Canada. michael_marentette@merck.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12107422

Citation

Marentette, Michael A., et al. "Antihypertensive Persistence and Drug Class." The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, vol. 18, no. 6, 2002, pp. 649-56.
Marentette MA, Gerth WC, Billings DK, et al. Antihypertensive persistence and drug class. Can J Cardiol. 2002;18(6):649-56.
Marentette, M. A., Gerth, W. C., Billings, D. K., & Zarnke, K. B. (2002). Antihypertensive persistence and drug class. The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, 18(6), pp. 649-56.
Marentette MA, et al. Antihypertensive Persistence and Drug Class. Can J Cardiol. 2002;18(6):649-56. PubMed PMID: 12107422.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antihypertensive persistence and drug class. AU - Marentette,Michael A, AU - Gerth,William C, AU - Billings,David K, AU - Zarnke,Kelly B, PY - 2002/7/11/pubmed PY - 2002/7/27/medline PY - 2002/7/11/entrez SP - 649 EP - 56 JF - The Canadian journal of cardiology JO - Can J Cardiol VL - 18 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Noncompliance with antihypertensive therapy is a major problem that hinders successful hypertension management. OBJECTIVE: To study antihypertensive drug persistence for hypertensive patients in routine clinical settings. METHODS: Hypertensive patients were retrospectively studied (1994 through 1998) using databases managed by Saskatchewan Health. The study population (46,458 people) included all patients with an International Classification of Diseases-9 code of 401, 402, 403 or 404, or any four-digit code included in these categories, who received at least one antihypertensive therapy prescription during the first 4.5 years of the study and received no antihypertensive therapy 12 months before the dispensing of the first therapy. Prescriptions were placed into the following drug classes: angiotensin II antagonists, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and diuretics. Persistence was determined for four intervals in the patient's therapy at 180, 360, 540 and 720 days. RESULTS: Drug class had a statistically significant (P<0.001) effect on persistence. Angiotensin II antagonists had the highest persistence followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers and diuretics. Persistence decreased as the time interval increased. Females were significantly more persistent than males (P<0.005), and elderly patients were significantly more persistent than younger patients (P<0.001) at each of the four time intervals. For angiotensin II antagonists, age and sex did not affect persistence. CONCLUSIONS: The consistently higher persistence associated with the use of angiotensin II antagonists may improve the management of hypertension. SN - 0828-282X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12107422/Antihypertensive_persistence_and_drug_class_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/highbloodpressure.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -