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[Prevalence of asymptommatic coeliac disease in children and adults in the Dresden region of Germany].
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2002; 127(28-29):1511-5DM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Coeliac disease (CD) can be present without any, only a few, or many symptoms. Since asymptomatic CD can have the same complications and also carries the same risk for malignant disease as clinically typical CD inadequately treated by diet, early diagnosis is essential. The prevalence of asymptomatic CD in the Dresden region was determined by antibody screening. At the same time the sensitivity and specificity of the different antibodies were calculated.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Anti-gliadin and endomysium antibodies and total IgA content were measured in the serum of 3004 children (group A), aged 5-12 years, and of 4313 blood donors (group B), aged 17-64 years. Small-intestine biopsies were recommended if either (1) endomysium antibodies (EmA) or (2) anti-gliadin antibodies (ACA) and clinical symptoms or (3) AGA-IgG in the presence of total IgA deficiency and clinical symptoms had been demonstrated.

RESULTS

EmA were demonstrated in 0.17% of group A and in 0.28% of group B. But AGA were found much more frequently (group A: 3.89%, group B: 3.76%). The number of cases of CD confirmed by biopsy indicated a prevalence of asymptomatic CD of 1 in 500 children and 1 in 540 adults. Sensitivity and specificity of EmA were significantly higher than those of AGA.

CONCLUSION

Compared with a previous study on the prevalence of clinically typical CD in the same region, the present investigation indicates a four-fold higher prevalence of asymptomatic CD. Coeliac-specific antibodies should, therefore, be measured much more widely in the presence of certain symptoms and risk factors. While in adults the measurement of EmA is sufficient to provide the indication for a small-intestine biopsy, both EmA and AGA should be determined before a biopsy is undertaken in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Germany. Jobst.Henker@ukd80.med.tu-dresden.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

12111656

Citation

Henker, J, et al. "[Prevalence of Asymptommatic Coeliac Disease in Children and Adults in the Dresden Region of Germany]." Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946), vol. 127, no. 28-29, 2002, pp. 1511-5.
Henker J, Lösel A, Conrad K, et al. [Prevalence of asymptommatic coeliac disease in children and adults in the Dresden region of Germany]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2002;127(28-29):1511-5.
Henker, J., Lösel, A., Conrad, K., Hirsch, T., & Leupold, W. (2002). [Prevalence of asymptommatic coeliac disease in children and adults in the Dresden region of Germany]. Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946), 127(28-29), pp. 1511-5.
Henker J, et al. [Prevalence of Asymptommatic Coeliac Disease in Children and Adults in the Dresden Region of Germany]. Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2002 Jul 12;127(28-29):1511-5. PubMed PMID: 12111656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Prevalence of asymptommatic coeliac disease in children and adults in the Dresden region of Germany]. AU - Henker,J, AU - Lösel,A, AU - Conrad,K, AU - Hirsch,Th, AU - Leupold,W, PY - 2002/7/12/pubmed PY - 2002/9/11/medline PY - 2002/7/12/entrez SP - 1511 EP - 5 JF - Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift (1946) JO - Dtsch. Med. Wochenschr. VL - 127 IS - 28-29 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Coeliac disease (CD) can be present without any, only a few, or many symptoms. Since asymptomatic CD can have the same complications and also carries the same risk for malignant disease as clinically typical CD inadequately treated by diet, early diagnosis is essential. The prevalence of asymptomatic CD in the Dresden region was determined by antibody screening. At the same time the sensitivity and specificity of the different antibodies were calculated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anti-gliadin and endomysium antibodies and total IgA content were measured in the serum of 3004 children (group A), aged 5-12 years, and of 4313 blood donors (group B), aged 17-64 years. Small-intestine biopsies were recommended if either (1) endomysium antibodies (EmA) or (2) anti-gliadin antibodies (ACA) and clinical symptoms or (3) AGA-IgG in the presence of total IgA deficiency and clinical symptoms had been demonstrated. RESULTS: EmA were demonstrated in 0.17% of group A and in 0.28% of group B. But AGA were found much more frequently (group A: 3.89%, group B: 3.76%). The number of cases of CD confirmed by biopsy indicated a prevalence of asymptomatic CD of 1 in 500 children and 1 in 540 adults. Sensitivity and specificity of EmA were significantly higher than those of AGA. CONCLUSION: Compared with a previous study on the prevalence of clinically typical CD in the same region, the present investigation indicates a four-fold higher prevalence of asymptomatic CD. Coeliac-specific antibodies should, therefore, be measured much more widely in the presence of certain symptoms and risk factors. While in adults the measurement of EmA is sufficient to provide the indication for a small-intestine biopsy, both EmA and AGA should be determined before a biopsy is undertaken in children. SN - 0012-0472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12111656/[Prevalence_of_asymptommatic_coeliac_disease_in_children_and_adults_in_the_Dresden_region_of_Germany]_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2002-32757 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -