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Effect of intravenous droperidol on intraocular pressure and retrobulbar hemodynamics.
Eur J Ophthalmol. 2002 May-Jun; 12(3):193-9.EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Topically-applied dopamine antagonists reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) and inrease retinal blood flow in animal models. We examined the acute effects of intravenous infusion of a dopamine blocker (droperidol) on these parameters in healthy humans.

METHODS

Sixteen subjects free from ocular or systemic disease (mean age 33 +/- 10 yrs) received either 5 mg i.v. droperidol over 5 minutes, or i.v. saline placebo in double-masked fashion. IOP was determined 30 and 60 minutes later, while color Doppler imaging was used to determine flow velocities in the ophthalmic, central retinal, and nasal and temporal posterior ciliary arteries 60 minutes after drug infusion.

RESULTS

30 minutes after drug infusion, IOP was reduced 6.0 mmHg as compared with baseline (p<0.001); after 60 minutes, IOP remained reduced by 3.7 mmHg (p<0.001). Placebo had no effect on IOP. While droperidol slightly elevated blood pressure and increased the calculated ocular perfusion pressure, the drug reduced visual acuity and contrast sensitivity (p<0.05). Droperidol elevated peak systolic velocity in the central retinal and nasal posterior ciliary arteries, without changing end-diastolic velocity or the resistance index in either of these vessels. Droperidol had no effect on flow velocities in the ophthalmic artery or the temporal posterior ciliary artery.

CONCLUSIONS

The rapid and marked ocular hypotension resulting from intravenous droperidol suggests that this agent may prove useful in the management of acute ocular hypertension. The retrobulbar changes consequent to the ocular tension reduction likely represent autoregulatory responses to altered ocular perfusion pressure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis 46202, USA. alharris@indiana.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12113564

Citation

Harris, A, et al. "Effect of Intravenous Droperidol On Intraocular Pressure and Retrobulbar Hemodynamics." European Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 12, no. 3, 2002, pp. 193-9.
Harris A, Zalish M, Kagemann L, et al. Effect of intravenous droperidol on intraocular pressure and retrobulbar hemodynamics. Eur J Ophthalmol. 2002;12(3):193-9.
Harris, A., Zalish, M., Kagemann, L., Siesky, B., Migliardi, R., & Garzozi, H. J. (2002). Effect of intravenous droperidol on intraocular pressure and retrobulbar hemodynamics. European Journal of Ophthalmology, 12(3), 193-9.
Harris A, et al. Effect of Intravenous Droperidol On Intraocular Pressure and Retrobulbar Hemodynamics. Eur J Ophthalmol. 2002 May-Jun;12(3):193-9. PubMed PMID: 12113564.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of intravenous droperidol on intraocular pressure and retrobulbar hemodynamics. AU - Harris,A, AU - Zalish,M, AU - Kagemann,L, AU - Siesky,B, AU - Migliardi,R, AU - Garzozi,H J, PY - 2002/7/13/pubmed PY - 2002/12/18/medline PY - 2002/7/13/entrez SP - 193 EP - 9 JF - European journal of ophthalmology JO - Eur J Ophthalmol VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: Topically-applied dopamine antagonists reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) and inrease retinal blood flow in animal models. We examined the acute effects of intravenous infusion of a dopamine blocker (droperidol) on these parameters in healthy humans. METHODS: Sixteen subjects free from ocular or systemic disease (mean age 33 +/- 10 yrs) received either 5 mg i.v. droperidol over 5 minutes, or i.v. saline placebo in double-masked fashion. IOP was determined 30 and 60 minutes later, while color Doppler imaging was used to determine flow velocities in the ophthalmic, central retinal, and nasal and temporal posterior ciliary arteries 60 minutes after drug infusion. RESULTS: 30 minutes after drug infusion, IOP was reduced 6.0 mmHg as compared with baseline (p<0.001); after 60 minutes, IOP remained reduced by 3.7 mmHg (p<0.001). Placebo had no effect on IOP. While droperidol slightly elevated blood pressure and increased the calculated ocular perfusion pressure, the drug reduced visual acuity and contrast sensitivity (p<0.05). Droperidol elevated peak systolic velocity in the central retinal and nasal posterior ciliary arteries, without changing end-diastolic velocity or the resistance index in either of these vessels. Droperidol had no effect on flow velocities in the ophthalmic artery or the temporal posterior ciliary artery. CONCLUSIONS: The rapid and marked ocular hypotension resulting from intravenous droperidol suggests that this agent may prove useful in the management of acute ocular hypertension. The retrobulbar changes consequent to the ocular tension reduction likely represent autoregulatory responses to altered ocular perfusion pressure. SN - 1120-6721 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12113564/Effect_of_intravenous_droperidol_on_intraocular_pressure_and_retrobulbar_hemodynamics_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/112067210201200304?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -