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Communication with deaf and hard-of-hearing people: a guide for medical education.
Acad Med. 2002 Jul; 77(7):694-700.AM

Abstract

Some physicians may be insufficiently prepared to work with the many patients who have hearing loss. People with hearing loss constitute approximately 9% of the U.S. population, and the prevalence is increasing. Patients with hearing loss and their physicians report communication difficulties; physicians also report feeling less comfortable with these patients. Although communication with patients plays a major role in determining diagnoses and management, little attention is given to teaching medical students and residents the skills necessary to facilitate communication when hearing loss is involved. The need for these skills will increase with the expected rise in the number of such patients. The author presents the rationale for including information about hearing loss in curricula on patient-doctor communication, and suggests curricular content, including background regarding hearing loss and techniques that can enhance the physician's ability to listen to (that is, "hear") and learn about the stories of these patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. Steven_Barnett@URMC.Rochester.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12114142

Citation

Barnett, Steven. "Communication With Deaf and Hard-of-hearing People: a Guide for Medical Education." Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, vol. 77, no. 7, 2002, pp. 694-700.
Barnett S. Communication with deaf and hard-of-hearing people: a guide for medical education. Acad Med. 2002;77(7):694-700.
Barnett, S. (2002). Communication with deaf and hard-of-hearing people: a guide for medical education. Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 77(7), 694-700.
Barnett S. Communication With Deaf and Hard-of-hearing People: a Guide for Medical Education. Acad Med. 2002;77(7):694-700. PubMed PMID: 12114142.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Communication with deaf and hard-of-hearing people: a guide for medical education. A1 - Barnett,Steven, PY - 2002/7/13/pubmed PY - 2002/8/16/medline PY - 2002/7/13/entrez SP - 694 EP - 700 JF - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges JO - Acad Med VL - 77 IS - 7 N2 - Some physicians may be insufficiently prepared to work with the many patients who have hearing loss. People with hearing loss constitute approximately 9% of the U.S. population, and the prevalence is increasing. Patients with hearing loss and their physicians report communication difficulties; physicians also report feeling less comfortable with these patients. Although communication with patients plays a major role in determining diagnoses and management, little attention is given to teaching medical students and residents the skills necessary to facilitate communication when hearing loss is involved. The need for these skills will increase with the expected rise in the number of such patients. The author presents the rationale for including information about hearing loss in curricula on patient-doctor communication, and suggests curricular content, including background regarding hearing loss and techniques that can enhance the physician's ability to listen to (that is, "hear") and learn about the stories of these patients. SN - 1040-2446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12114142/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00001888-200207000-00009 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -