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A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of vitamin C in the management of hypertension and lipids.

Abstract

The effect of vitamin C on blood pressure is not well established. This is a randomized, double-blind control trial. Eligible patients were followed for 8 months. Patients were randomized to 500, 1000, or 2000 mg vitamin C. During each visit, a history including medication change was obtained and standardized blood pressure measurements were performed. A 1-week dietary diary was filled out before each visit. Multiple regression analysis and subsequent multiple comparisons were used for data analysis. Fifty-four patients satisfied our criteria and agreed to participate. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 62 +/- 2 years; 52% men, 90% whites) were randomized to the three doses of vitamin C. Overall compliance was 48 +/- 2%. Both mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased during the vitamin C supplementation phase [mean SBP dropped by 4.5 +/- 1.8 mm Hg (P <.05) and DBP by 2.8 +/- 1.2 mm Hg (P <.05)]. There was no difference between the three vitamin C groups (P =.48). This effect was significant for only 1 month of supplementation, but the trend persisted. There was no reported intolerance to vitamin C. There was no change in lipid levels after 6 months of treatment. Vitamin C supplementation lowers blood pressure in mildly hypertensive patients. There is no additional benefit for a higher dose than 500 mg daily. The effect of vitamin C is most likely to be only short term.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Geriatrics, Palmetto Health Alliance and University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

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    Source

    MeSH

    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Blood Pressure
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Double-Blind Method
    Female
    Humans
    Hypertension
    Lipids
    Male
    Middle Aged

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12115017

    Citation

    Hajjar, Ihab M., et al. "A Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Trial of Vitamin C in the Management of Hypertension and Lipids." American Journal of Therapeutics, vol. 9, no. 4, 2002, pp. 289-93.
    Hajjar IM, George V, Sasse EA, et al. A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of vitamin C in the management of hypertension and lipids. Am J Ther. 2002;9(4):289-93.
    Hajjar, I. M., George, V., Sasse, E. A., & Kochar, M. S. (2002). A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of vitamin C in the management of hypertension and lipids. American Journal of Therapeutics, 9(4), pp. 289-93.
    Hajjar IM, et al. A Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Trial of Vitamin C in the Management of Hypertension and Lipids. Am J Ther. 2002;9(4):289-93. PubMed PMID: 12115017.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of vitamin C in the management of hypertension and lipids. AU - Hajjar,Ihab M, AU - George,Varghese, AU - Sasse,Edward A, AU - Kochar,Mahendr S, PY - 2002/7/13/pubmed PY - 2002/9/25/medline PY - 2002/7/13/entrez SP - 289 EP - 93 JF - American journal of therapeutics JO - Am J Ther VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - The effect of vitamin C on blood pressure is not well established. This is a randomized, double-blind control trial. Eligible patients were followed for 8 months. Patients were randomized to 500, 1000, or 2000 mg vitamin C. During each visit, a history including medication change was obtained and standardized blood pressure measurements were performed. A 1-week dietary diary was filled out before each visit. Multiple regression analysis and subsequent multiple comparisons were used for data analysis. Fifty-four patients satisfied our criteria and agreed to participate. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 62 +/- 2 years; 52% men, 90% whites) were randomized to the three doses of vitamin C. Overall compliance was 48 +/- 2%. Both mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased during the vitamin C supplementation phase [mean SBP dropped by 4.5 +/- 1.8 mm Hg (P <.05) and DBP by 2.8 +/- 1.2 mm Hg (P <.05)]. There was no difference between the three vitamin C groups (P =.48). This effect was significant for only 1 month of supplementation, but the trend persisted. There was no reported intolerance to vitamin C. There was no change in lipid levels after 6 months of treatment. Vitamin C supplementation lowers blood pressure in mildly hypertensive patients. There is no additional benefit for a higher dose than 500 mg daily. The effect of vitamin C is most likely to be only short term. SN - 1075-2765 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12115017/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=12115017.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -