Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Resting energy expenditure in children and adolescents: agreement between calorimetry and prediction equations.
Clin Nutr 2002; 21(3):255-60CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

To assess the degree of agreement between indirect calorimetry and five equations commonly used to predict resting energy expenditure (REE) in obese and non-obese children and adolescents.

METHODS

In 116 children and adolescents (57 obese and 59 non-obese) aged between 7.8 and 16.6 years, REE was measured (MREE) by open-circuit indirect calorimetry under standardized conditions. REE was predicted (PREE) in all subjects with equations from the Food and Agriculture/World Health Organization/United Nations University (FAO/WHO/UNU), Maffeis et al., Harris and Benedict, and two from Schofield: one using weight (W) and one using height and weight (H-W). Agreement between indirect calorimetry and equations was assessed following the Bland-Altman method.

RESULTS

In the entire cohort group, only data from FAO/WHO/UNU, Schofield-W and Schofield-HW equations showed non-statistic differences against calorimetry results. When agreement between equations and calorimetry was tested, Schofield-HW equation showed the lowest mean MREE-PREE difference: 3.7 kcal/d (limits of agreement -293 and 300 kcal/d; 95% confidence interval for the bias -24.0 to 31.5 kcal/d) and the best agreement. Group by group, equations which obtained the best agreement were: FAO/WHO/UNU in girls, Schofield-HW in boys, Schofield-HW in obese, and Schofield-W in non-obese.

CONCLUSIONS

Until more accurate prediction equations are developed, we recommend Schofield-HW equations for REE studies with a mixed population of obese and non-obese children and adolescents; however, FAO/WHO/UNU equation may also be useful in girls and Schofield-W equation in non-obese children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Pediatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12127936

Citation

Rodríguez, G, et al. "Resting Energy Expenditure in Children and Adolescents: Agreement Between Calorimetry and Prediction Equations." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 21, no. 3, 2002, pp. 255-60.
Rodríguez G, Moreno LA, Sarría A, et al. Resting energy expenditure in children and adolescents: agreement between calorimetry and prediction equations. Clin Nutr. 2002;21(3):255-60.
Rodríguez, G., Moreno, L. A., Sarría, A., Fleta, J., & Bueno, M. (2002). Resting energy expenditure in children and adolescents: agreement between calorimetry and prediction equations. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 21(3), pp. 255-60.
Rodríguez G, et al. Resting Energy Expenditure in Children and Adolescents: Agreement Between Calorimetry and Prediction Equations. Clin Nutr. 2002;21(3):255-60. PubMed PMID: 12127936.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resting energy expenditure in children and adolescents: agreement between calorimetry and prediction equations. AU - Rodríguez,G, AU - Moreno,L A, AU - Sarría,A, AU - Fleta,J, AU - Bueno,M, PY - 2002/7/20/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/7/20/entrez SP - 255 EP - 60 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To assess the degree of agreement between indirect calorimetry and five equations commonly used to predict resting energy expenditure (REE) in obese and non-obese children and adolescents. METHODS: In 116 children and adolescents (57 obese and 59 non-obese) aged between 7.8 and 16.6 years, REE was measured (MREE) by open-circuit indirect calorimetry under standardized conditions. REE was predicted (PREE) in all subjects with equations from the Food and Agriculture/World Health Organization/United Nations University (FAO/WHO/UNU), Maffeis et al., Harris and Benedict, and two from Schofield: one using weight (W) and one using height and weight (H-W). Agreement between indirect calorimetry and equations was assessed following the Bland-Altman method. RESULTS: In the entire cohort group, only data from FAO/WHO/UNU, Schofield-W and Schofield-HW equations showed non-statistic differences against calorimetry results. When agreement between equations and calorimetry was tested, Schofield-HW equation showed the lowest mean MREE-PREE difference: 3.7 kcal/d (limits of agreement -293 and 300 kcal/d; 95% confidence interval for the bias -24.0 to 31.5 kcal/d) and the best agreement. Group by group, equations which obtained the best agreement were: FAO/WHO/UNU in girls, Schofield-HW in boys, Schofield-HW in obese, and Schofield-W in non-obese. CONCLUSIONS: Until more accurate prediction equations are developed, we recommend Schofield-HW equations for REE studies with a mixed population of obese and non-obese children and adolescents; however, FAO/WHO/UNU equation may also be useful in girls and Schofield-W equation in non-obese children. SN - 0261-5614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12127936/Resting_energy_expenditure_in_children_and_adolescents:_agreement_between_calorimetry_and_prediction_equations_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S026156140190531X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -