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Fetal leptin is a signal of fat mass independent of maternal nutrition in ewes fed at or above maintenance energy requirements.
Biol Reprod 2002; 67(2):493-9BR

Abstract

In adults, circulating leptin concentrations are dependent on body fat content and on current nutritional status. However, the relationships among maternal nutrient intake, fetal adiposity, and circulating leptin concentrations before birth are unknown. We investigated the effects of an increase in nutrient intake in the pregnant ewe on fetal adiposity and plasma leptin concentrations during late gestation. Between 115 and 139-141 days gestation (term = 147 +/- 3 days gestation), ewes were fed a diet calculated to provide either maintenance (control, n = 6) or approximately 155% of maintenance requirements (well-fed, n = 8). The fetal fat depots (perirenal and interscapular) were dissected, and the relative proportion of unilocular and multilocular adipocytes in each depot was determined. Maternal plasma glucose and leptin concentrations were significantly increased in well-fed ewes. Fetal plasma glucose concentrations were also higher in the well-fed group (115-139 days gestation: control, 1.65 +/- 0.14 mmol/L; well-fed, 2.00 +/- 0.14 mmol/L; F = 5.76, P < 0.04). There was no effect of increasing maternal feed intake on total fat mass, the relative mass of unilocular fat, or fetal plasma leptin concentrations (115-139 days gestation: control, 5.2 +/- 0.8 ng/ml; well-fed, 4.7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml). However, in both the control and well-fed groups fetal plasma leptin concentrations (y) were positively correlated with the relative mass of unilocular fat (x): y = 1.51x + 1.70; (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Thus, fetal leptin may play a role as a signal of unilocular fat mass in the fetus when maternal nutrient intake is at or above maintenance requirements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, Adelaide University, South Australia 5005, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12135887

Citation

Mühlhäusler, B S., et al. "Fetal Leptin Is a Signal of Fat Mass Independent of Maternal Nutrition in Ewes Fed at or Above Maintenance Energy Requirements." Biology of Reproduction, vol. 67, no. 2, 2002, pp. 493-9.
Mühlhäusler BS, Roberts CT, McFarlane JR, et al. Fetal leptin is a signal of fat mass independent of maternal nutrition in ewes fed at or above maintenance energy requirements. Biol Reprod. 2002;67(2):493-9.
Mühlhäusler, B. S., Roberts, C. T., McFarlane, J. R., Kauter, K. G., & McMillen, I. C. (2002). Fetal leptin is a signal of fat mass independent of maternal nutrition in ewes fed at or above maintenance energy requirements. Biology of Reproduction, 67(2), pp. 493-9.
Mühlhäusler BS, et al. Fetal Leptin Is a Signal of Fat Mass Independent of Maternal Nutrition in Ewes Fed at or Above Maintenance Energy Requirements. Biol Reprod. 2002;67(2):493-9. PubMed PMID: 12135887.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fetal leptin is a signal of fat mass independent of maternal nutrition in ewes fed at or above maintenance energy requirements. AU - Mühlhäusler,B S, AU - Roberts,C T, AU - McFarlane,J R, AU - Kauter,K G, AU - McMillen,I C, PY - 2002/7/24/pubmed PY - 2003/1/25/medline PY - 2002/7/24/entrez SP - 493 EP - 9 JF - Biology of reproduction JO - Biol. Reprod. VL - 67 IS - 2 N2 - In adults, circulating leptin concentrations are dependent on body fat content and on current nutritional status. However, the relationships among maternal nutrient intake, fetal adiposity, and circulating leptin concentrations before birth are unknown. We investigated the effects of an increase in nutrient intake in the pregnant ewe on fetal adiposity and plasma leptin concentrations during late gestation. Between 115 and 139-141 days gestation (term = 147 +/- 3 days gestation), ewes were fed a diet calculated to provide either maintenance (control, n = 6) or approximately 155% of maintenance requirements (well-fed, n = 8). The fetal fat depots (perirenal and interscapular) were dissected, and the relative proportion of unilocular and multilocular adipocytes in each depot was determined. Maternal plasma glucose and leptin concentrations were significantly increased in well-fed ewes. Fetal plasma glucose concentrations were also higher in the well-fed group (115-139 days gestation: control, 1.65 +/- 0.14 mmol/L; well-fed, 2.00 +/- 0.14 mmol/L; F = 5.76, P < 0.04). There was no effect of increasing maternal feed intake on total fat mass, the relative mass of unilocular fat, or fetal plasma leptin concentrations (115-139 days gestation: control, 5.2 +/- 0.8 ng/ml; well-fed, 4.7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml). However, in both the control and well-fed groups fetal plasma leptin concentrations (y) were positively correlated with the relative mass of unilocular fat (x): y = 1.51x + 1.70; (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Thus, fetal leptin may play a role as a signal of unilocular fat mass in the fetus when maternal nutrient intake is at or above maintenance requirements. SN - 0006-3363 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12135887/Fetal_leptin_is_a_signal_of_fat_mass_independent_of_maternal_nutrition_in_ewes_fed_at_or_above_maintenance_energy_requirements_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biolreprod/article-lookup/doi/10.1095/biolreprod67.2.493 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -