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Predictors of short-term and long-term scholarly activity by academic faculty: a departmental case study.
Fam Med. 2002 Jun; 34(6):455-61.FM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

What leads to individual success or failure in family medicine scholarly activity? We prospectively studied predictors of short-term (2 years) and long-term (5 years) scholarly productivity in the faculty of one university family medicine department.

METHODS

All department faculty (n=37) between 1986 and 1998 completed an annual survey of their scholarly activities (238 person years). Using bivariate and multiple regression analyses, we examined the influence of faculty demographics, professional degrees and training, academic rank, and responsibilities in areas such as patient care, teaching, and administration on 2-year and 5-year output of presentations, publications, and grants.

RESULTS

Productivity (defined as publications, external presentations, and funded grants) declined with time since medical school graduation. PhD and MD/MS faculty were more productive than MD faculty. Fellowship training was also associated with greater productivity, as was national service to journals and grant review panels. Administrative activity below the level of department chair or vice chair did not detract from scholarly activity. Clinical time demonstrated only a weak, nonsignificant negative correlation with most of our scholarly activity measures.

CONCLUSIONS

As previously noted, research training through advanced degrees or fellowships enhances scholarly activity. The effect on scholarly productivity of time spent in clinical work or on administrative tasks requires further study across different departments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 78229-3900, USA. ferrerr@uthscsa.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12164624

Citation

Ferrer, Robert L., and David A. Katerndahl. "Predictors of Short-term and Long-term Scholarly Activity By Academic Faculty: a Departmental Case Study." Family Medicine, vol. 34, no. 6, 2002, pp. 455-61.
Ferrer RL, Katerndahl DA. Predictors of short-term and long-term scholarly activity by academic faculty: a departmental case study. Fam Med. 2002;34(6):455-61.
Ferrer, R. L., & Katerndahl, D. A. (2002). Predictors of short-term and long-term scholarly activity by academic faculty: a departmental case study. Family Medicine, 34(6), 455-61.
Ferrer RL, Katerndahl DA. Predictors of Short-term and Long-term Scholarly Activity By Academic Faculty: a Departmental Case Study. Fam Med. 2002;34(6):455-61. PubMed PMID: 12164624.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictors of short-term and long-term scholarly activity by academic faculty: a departmental case study. AU - Ferrer,Robert L, AU - Katerndahl,David A, PY - 2002/8/8/pubmed PY - 2003/1/9/medline PY - 2002/8/8/entrez SP - 455 EP - 61 JF - Family medicine JO - Fam Med VL - 34 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: What leads to individual success or failure in family medicine scholarly activity? We prospectively studied predictors of short-term (2 years) and long-term (5 years) scholarly productivity in the faculty of one university family medicine department. METHODS: All department faculty (n=37) between 1986 and 1998 completed an annual survey of their scholarly activities (238 person years). Using bivariate and multiple regression analyses, we examined the influence of faculty demographics, professional degrees and training, academic rank, and responsibilities in areas such as patient care, teaching, and administration on 2-year and 5-year output of presentations, publications, and grants. RESULTS: Productivity (defined as publications, external presentations, and funded grants) declined with time since medical school graduation. PhD and MD/MS faculty were more productive than MD faculty. Fellowship training was also associated with greater productivity, as was national service to journals and grant review panels. Administrative activity below the level of department chair or vice chair did not detract from scholarly activity. Clinical time demonstrated only a weak, nonsignificant negative correlation with most of our scholarly activity measures. CONCLUSIONS: As previously noted, research training through advanced degrees or fellowships enhances scholarly activity. The effect on scholarly productivity of time spent in clinical work or on administrative tasks requires further study across different departments. SN - 0742-3225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12164624/Predictors_of_short_term_and_long_term_scholarly_activity_by_academic_faculty:_a_departmental_case_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -