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Differences in resting metabolic rate between white and African-American young adults.
Obes Res. 2002 Aug; 10(8):726-32.OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

A reported lower resting metabolic rate (RMR) in African-American women than in white women could explain the higher prevalence of obesity in the former group. Little information is available on RMR in African-American men.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

We assessed RMR by indirect calorimetry and body composition by DXA in 395 adults ages 28 to 40 years (100 African-American men, 95 white men, 94 African-American women, and 106 white women), recruited from participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA), Birmingham, Alabama, and Oakland, California, field centers.

RESULTS

Using linear models, fat-free mass, fat mass, visceral fat, and age were significantly related to RMR, but the usual level of physical activity was not. After adjustment for these variables, mean RMR was significantly higher in whites (1665.07 +/- 10.78 kcal/d) than in African Americans (1585.05 +/- 11.02 kcal/d) by 80 +/- 16 kcal/d (p < 0.0001). The ethnic x gender interaction was not significant (p = 0.9512), indicating that the difference in RMR between African-American and white subjects was similar for men and women.

DISCUSSION

RMR is approximately 5% higher in white than in African-American participants in CARDIA. The difference was the same for men and women and for lean and obese individuals. The prevalence of obesity is not higher in African-American men than in white men. Because of these reasons, we believe that RMR differences are unlikely to be a primary explanation for why African-American women are more prone to obesity than white women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Human Nutrition, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado 80262, USA. Teresa.Sharp@UCHSC.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12181380

Citation

Sharp, Teresa A., et al. "Differences in Resting Metabolic Rate Between White and African-American Young Adults." Obesity Research, vol. 10, no. 8, 2002, pp. 726-32.
Sharp TA, Bell ML, Grunwald GK, et al. Differences in resting metabolic rate between white and African-American young adults. Obes Res. 2002;10(8):726-32.
Sharp, T. A., Bell, M. L., Grunwald, G. K., Schmitz, K. H., Sidney, S., Lewis, C. E., Tolan, K., & Hill, J. O. (2002). Differences in resting metabolic rate between white and African-American young adults. Obesity Research, 10(8), 726-32.
Sharp TA, et al. Differences in Resting Metabolic Rate Between White and African-American Young Adults. Obes Res. 2002;10(8):726-32. PubMed PMID: 12181380.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in resting metabolic rate between white and African-American young adults. AU - Sharp,Teresa A, AU - Bell,Melanie L, AU - Grunwald,Gary K, AU - Schmitz,Kathryn H, AU - Sidney,Stephen, AU - Lewis,Cora E, AU - Tolan,Kim, AU - Hill,James O, PY - 2002/8/16/pubmed PY - 2003/1/31/medline PY - 2002/8/16/entrez SP - 726 EP - 32 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes Res VL - 10 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: A reported lower resting metabolic rate (RMR) in African-American women than in white women could explain the higher prevalence of obesity in the former group. Little information is available on RMR in African-American men. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We assessed RMR by indirect calorimetry and body composition by DXA in 395 adults ages 28 to 40 years (100 African-American men, 95 white men, 94 African-American women, and 106 white women), recruited from participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA), Birmingham, Alabama, and Oakland, California, field centers. RESULTS: Using linear models, fat-free mass, fat mass, visceral fat, and age were significantly related to RMR, but the usual level of physical activity was not. After adjustment for these variables, mean RMR was significantly higher in whites (1665.07 +/- 10.78 kcal/d) than in African Americans (1585.05 +/- 11.02 kcal/d) by 80 +/- 16 kcal/d (p < 0.0001). The ethnic x gender interaction was not significant (p = 0.9512), indicating that the difference in RMR between African-American and white subjects was similar for men and women. DISCUSSION: RMR is approximately 5% higher in white than in African-American participants in CARDIA. The difference was the same for men and women and for lean and obese individuals. The prevalence of obesity is not higher in African-American men than in white men. Because of these reasons, we believe that RMR differences are unlikely to be a primary explanation for why African-American women are more prone to obesity than white women. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12181380/Differences_in_resting_metabolic_rate_between_white_and_African_American_young_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2002.99 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -