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Proterozoic ocean chemistry and evolution: a bioinorganic bridge?
Science. 2002 Aug 16; 297(5584):1137-42.Sci

Abstract

Recent data imply that for much of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 543 million years ago), Earth's oceans were moderately oxic at the surface and sulfidic at depth. Under these conditions, biologically important trace metals would have been scarce in most marine environments, potentially restricting the nitrogen cycle, affecting primary productivity, and limiting the ecological distribution of eukaryotic algae. Oceanic redox conditions and their bioinorganic consequences may thus help to explain observed patterns of Proterozoic evolution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA. anbar@earth.rochester.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12183619

Citation

Anbar, A D., and A H. Knoll. "Proterozoic Ocean Chemistry and Evolution: a Bioinorganic Bridge?" Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 297, no. 5584, 2002, pp. 1137-42.
Anbar AD, Knoll AH. Proterozoic ocean chemistry and evolution: a bioinorganic bridge? Science. 2002;297(5584):1137-42.
Anbar, A. D., & Knoll, A. H. (2002). Proterozoic ocean chemistry and evolution: a bioinorganic bridge? Science (New York, N.Y.), 297(5584), 1137-42.
Anbar AD, Knoll AH. Proterozoic Ocean Chemistry and Evolution: a Bioinorganic Bridge. Science. 2002 Aug 16;297(5584):1137-42. PubMed PMID: 12183619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Proterozoic ocean chemistry and evolution: a bioinorganic bridge? AU - Anbar,A D, AU - Knoll,A H, PY - 2002/8/17/pubmed PY - 2002/9/24/medline PY - 2002/8/17/entrez SP - 1137 EP - 42 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 297 IS - 5584 N2 - Recent data imply that for much of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 543 million years ago), Earth's oceans were moderately oxic at the surface and sulfidic at depth. Under these conditions, biologically important trace metals would have been scarce in most marine environments, potentially restricting the nitrogen cycle, affecting primary productivity, and limiting the ecological distribution of eukaryotic algae. Oceanic redox conditions and their bioinorganic consequences may thus help to explain observed patterns of Proterozoic evolution. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12183619/Proterozoic_ocean_chemistry_and_evolution:_a_bioinorganic_bridge L2 - https:///www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.1069651?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -