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Resource utilization associated with irritable bowel syndrome in the United States 1987-1997.
Dig Dis Sci 2002; 47(8):1705-15DD

Abstract

This study uses national databases to examine the impact of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) on resource utilization in the United States. Approximately 1.5-2.7 million physician visits (599-1,043 per 100,000) yearly were related to IBS, with 45.3% seen by gastroenterologists, and 89% prescribed medications. Rates of physician visits by women were approximately 2.4-3.3 times higher than that for men. The average number of medication prescribed per visit was 1.83. Approximately 89% of the visits were prescribed with medications. The rate of hospitalization (5.1 per 100,000 in 1997) decreased by 60% and length of stay decreased from 5.5 to 3.1 days in the past decade. The average charges of IBS-related hospitalization were US$7,882. Our study found an apparent decreasing trend of IBS-related hospitalizations and no marked increase in office consultations in the past decade. However, a better case identification criterion is necessary to estimate the true disease burden.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MEDTAP International Inc, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12184519

Citation

Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, et al. "Resource Utilization Associated With Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the United States 1987-1997." Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 47, no. 8, 2002, pp. 1705-15.
Shih YC, Barghout VE, Sandler RS, et al. Resource utilization associated with irritable bowel syndrome in the United States 1987-1997. Dig Dis Sci. 2002;47(8):1705-15.
Shih, Y. C., Barghout, V. E., Sandler, R. S., Jhingran, P., Sasane, M., Cook, S., ... Halpern, M. (2002). Resource utilization associated with irritable bowel syndrome in the United States 1987-1997. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 47(8), pp. 1705-15.
Shih YC, et al. Resource Utilization Associated With Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the United States 1987-1997. Dig Dis Sci. 2002;47(8):1705-15. PubMed PMID: 12184519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resource utilization associated with irritable bowel syndrome in the United States 1987-1997. AU - Shih,Ya-Chen Tina, AU - Barghout,Victoria E, AU - Sandler,Robert S, AU - Jhingran,Priti, AU - Sasane,Medha, AU - Cook,Suzanne, AU - Gibbons,David C, AU - Halpern,Michael, PY - 2002/8/20/pubmed PY - 2002/8/31/medline PY - 2002/8/20/entrez SP - 1705 EP - 15 JF - Digestive diseases and sciences JO - Dig. Dis. Sci. VL - 47 IS - 8 N2 - This study uses national databases to examine the impact of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) on resource utilization in the United States. Approximately 1.5-2.7 million physician visits (599-1,043 per 100,000) yearly were related to IBS, with 45.3% seen by gastroenterologists, and 89% prescribed medications. Rates of physician visits by women were approximately 2.4-3.3 times higher than that for men. The average number of medication prescribed per visit was 1.83. Approximately 89% of the visits were prescribed with medications. The rate of hospitalization (5.1 per 100,000 in 1997) decreased by 60% and length of stay decreased from 5.5 to 3.1 days in the past decade. The average charges of IBS-related hospitalization were US$7,882. Our study found an apparent decreasing trend of IBS-related hospitalizations and no marked increase in office consultations in the past decade. However, a better case identification criterion is necessary to estimate the true disease burden. SN - 0163-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12184519/Resource_utilization_associated_with_irritable_bowel_syndrome_in_the_United_States_1987_1997_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=12184519.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -