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Determinants of serum HDL-C level in a Tehran urban population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002 Apr; 12(2):80-9.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Decreased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is one of the most common lipid disorders in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Existing evidence suggests that every 1 mg/dL decrease in serum HDL-C increases the risk of CAD by 2-3%. This study was performed in the year 2000 to study HDL-C determinants in a Tehran population.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We studied 9514 subjects (3942 men and 5572 women) aged 20-69 years, who participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS), completed a personal history questionnaire (especially concerning physical activity and cigarette smoking), and underwent a clinical examination including anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-C levels were measured, and OGTT was used to define diabetic patients according to WHO criteria. The women had a significantly higher mean HDL-C level than the mean (45 +/- 11 vs 38 +/- 9 mg/dL; p < 0.001); low HDL-C levels (< 35 mg/dL) were observed in 31% of the men and 13% of the women (p < 0.001). Obese subjects (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2) had a significantly lower HDL-C level than the normal subjects (42 +/- 11 vs 44 +/- 11 mg/dL: p < 0.001), and those with truncal obesity (WHR > or = 0.95 in men and > or = 0.8 in women) lower HDL-C levels than the normal subjects (37 +/- 9 vs 39 +/- 10 mg/dL in men and 44 +/- 11 vs 42 +/- 11 mg/dL in women; p < 0.001 for both). Smokers had a significantly lower HDL-C level than non-smokers (38 +/- 10 vs 43 +/- 11 mg/dL; p < 0.001) and a low HDL-C level was twice as common (36.4 vs 18.2%). Passive smokers also had lower HDL-C levels (42 +/- 11 vs 43 +/- 11 mg/dL; p < 0.001). Mean serum HDL-C was significantly lower in hypertriglyceridemic than those with normal triglycerides levels (men: 4 +/- 8 vs 40 +/- 9 mg/dL, p < 0.001; women: 40 +/- 10 vs 47 +/- 11 mg/dL, p < 0.01). Mean HDL-C levels were similar in subjects with different degrees of physical activity, as well as between diabetics and non-diabetics and hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the determinants of serum HDL-C levels were, in order of entering the model: hypertriglyceridemia (OR 3.4, p < 0.001), male sex (OR 3.1, p < 0.001), cigarette smoking (OR 1.7, p < 0.001), obesity (OR 1.4, p < 0.01), age (OR 0.9, p < 0.05), high WHR (OR 1.2, p < 0.05), and passive smoking (OR 1.1, p < 0.05). Physical activity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus did not enter the predictive model.

CONCLUSION

Apart from age and sex which are constitutional, and unmodifiable variables, the determinants of HDL-C level (hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, truncal obesity, cigarette smoking, and passive smoking) can be used in community CAD prevention programmes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Endocrine Research Center, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Azizi@erc-iran.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12189907

Citation

Azizi, F, et al. "Determinants of Serum HDL-C Level in a Tehran Urban Population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 12, no. 2, 2002, pp. 80-9.
Azizi F, Raiszadeh F, Salehi P, et al. Determinants of serum HDL-C level in a Tehran urban population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002;12(2):80-9.
Azizi, F., Raiszadeh, F., Salehi, P., Rahmani, M., Emami, H., Ghanbarian, A., & Hajipour, R. (2002). Determinants of serum HDL-C level in a Tehran urban population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 12(2), 80-9.
Azizi F, et al. Determinants of Serum HDL-C Level in a Tehran Urban Population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002;12(2):80-9. PubMed PMID: 12189907.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Determinants of serum HDL-C level in a Tehran urban population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. AU - Azizi,F, AU - Raiszadeh,F, AU - Salehi,P, AU - Rahmani,M, AU - Emami,H, AU - Ghanbarian,A, AU - Hajipour,R, PY - 2002/8/23/pubmed PY - 2003/1/15/medline PY - 2002/8/23/entrez SP - 80 EP - 9 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Decreased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is one of the most common lipid disorders in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Existing evidence suggests that every 1 mg/dL decrease in serum HDL-C increases the risk of CAD by 2-3%. This study was performed in the year 2000 to study HDL-C determinants in a Tehran population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 9514 subjects (3942 men and 5572 women) aged 20-69 years, who participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS), completed a personal history questionnaire (especially concerning physical activity and cigarette smoking), and underwent a clinical examination including anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-C levels were measured, and OGTT was used to define diabetic patients according to WHO criteria. The women had a significantly higher mean HDL-C level than the mean (45 +/- 11 vs 38 +/- 9 mg/dL; p < 0.001); low HDL-C levels (< 35 mg/dL) were observed in 31% of the men and 13% of the women (p < 0.001). Obese subjects (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2) had a significantly lower HDL-C level than the normal subjects (42 +/- 11 vs 44 +/- 11 mg/dL: p < 0.001), and those with truncal obesity (WHR > or = 0.95 in men and > or = 0.8 in women) lower HDL-C levels than the normal subjects (37 +/- 9 vs 39 +/- 10 mg/dL in men and 44 +/- 11 vs 42 +/- 11 mg/dL in women; p < 0.001 for both). Smokers had a significantly lower HDL-C level than non-smokers (38 +/- 10 vs 43 +/- 11 mg/dL; p < 0.001) and a low HDL-C level was twice as common (36.4 vs 18.2%). Passive smokers also had lower HDL-C levels (42 +/- 11 vs 43 +/- 11 mg/dL; p < 0.001). Mean serum HDL-C was significantly lower in hypertriglyceridemic than those with normal triglycerides levels (men: 4 +/- 8 vs 40 +/- 9 mg/dL, p < 0.001; women: 40 +/- 10 vs 47 +/- 11 mg/dL, p < 0.01). Mean HDL-C levels were similar in subjects with different degrees of physical activity, as well as between diabetics and non-diabetics and hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the determinants of serum HDL-C levels were, in order of entering the model: hypertriglyceridemia (OR 3.4, p < 0.001), male sex (OR 3.1, p < 0.001), cigarette smoking (OR 1.7, p < 0.001), obesity (OR 1.4, p < 0.01), age (OR 0.9, p < 0.05), high WHR (OR 1.2, p < 0.05), and passive smoking (OR 1.1, p < 0.05). Physical activity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus did not enter the predictive model. CONCLUSION: Apart from age and sex which are constitutional, and unmodifiable variables, the determinants of HDL-C level (hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, truncal obesity, cigarette smoking, and passive smoking) can be used in community CAD prevention programmes. SN - 0939-4753 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12189907/Determinants_of_serum_HDL_C_level_in_a_Tehran_urban_population:_the_Tehran_Lipid_and_Glucose_Study_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterydisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -