Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin and methacholine: effects of inhaled fluticasone.
Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Aug; 32(8):1174-9.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although inhaled corticosteroids are the most effective anti-inflammatory agents available for the treatment of asthma, they have, at best, only modest effects on airways responsiveness to methacholine. Thus, hyper-responsiveness to methacholine is a relatively insensitive monitor of the effectiveness of glucocorticoids in asthmatic subjects.

OBJECTIVE

The study aimed to determine if airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin provides a more sensitive index of glucocorticoid responsiveness in asthmatic subjects than does hyper-responsiveness to methacholine.

METHODS

A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study comparing the effects of inhaled fluticasone (220 micro g twice daily) on responsiveness to the two stimuli in asthmatic subjects who had never previously received corticosteroid therapy. Drug (n = 13) or placebo (n = 12) were administered for 16 weeks. Responsiveness to bradykinin and methacholine was determined at baseline and at 4 week intervals.

RESULTS

Placebo did not alter responsiveness to either stimulus compared to baseline. Fluticasone treatment significantly reduced responsiveness to bradykinin (P < 0.001 by Friedman anova) and methacholine (P = 0.02), but changes in responsiveness to bradykinin were significantly greater than those in methacholine responsiveness (P = 0.002). Bradykinin responsiveness was decreased at all treatment times compared to baseline, while methacholine responsiveness was not decreased until 8 weeks of therapy. When data were analyzed as changes from baseline (DeltaLog PD20), DeltaLog PD20 for methacholine was not different at any time-point between the two treatment groups. By contrast, DeltaLog PD20 for bradykinin was significantly greater in patients receiving fluticasone compared to those on placebo at all but the 16-week treatment time. Ten of 13 subjects receiving fluticasone failed, on at least one post-treatment visit, to show a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume (FEV1), even at the highest dose of bradykinin.

CONCLUSIONS

Airways responsiveness to bradykinin is more profoundly, and more rapidly, reduced by inhaled glucocorticoids than is responsiveness to methacholine. Airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin provides a convenient and sensitive monitor of glucocorticoid responsiveness in asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12190655

Citation

Reynolds, C J., et al. "Airways Hyper-responsiveness to Bradykinin and Methacholine: Effects of Inhaled Fluticasone." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 32, no. 8, 2002, pp. 1174-9.
Reynolds CJ, Togias A, Proud D. Airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin and methacholine: effects of inhaled fluticasone. Clin Exp Allergy. 2002;32(8):1174-9.
Reynolds, C. J., Togias, A., & Proud, D. (2002). Airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin and methacholine: effects of inhaled fluticasone. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 32(8), 1174-9.
Reynolds CJ, Togias A, Proud D. Airways Hyper-responsiveness to Bradykinin and Methacholine: Effects of Inhaled Fluticasone. Clin Exp Allergy. 2002;32(8):1174-9. PubMed PMID: 12190655.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin and methacholine: effects of inhaled fluticasone. AU - Reynolds,C J, AU - Togias,A, AU - Proud,D, PY - 2002/8/23/pubmed PY - 2003/3/19/medline PY - 2002/8/23/entrez SP - 1174 EP - 9 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin. Exp. Allergy VL - 32 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although inhaled corticosteroids are the most effective anti-inflammatory agents available for the treatment of asthma, they have, at best, only modest effects on airways responsiveness to methacholine. Thus, hyper-responsiveness to methacholine is a relatively insensitive monitor of the effectiveness of glucocorticoids in asthmatic subjects. OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to determine if airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin provides a more sensitive index of glucocorticoid responsiveness in asthmatic subjects than does hyper-responsiveness to methacholine. METHODS: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study comparing the effects of inhaled fluticasone (220 micro g twice daily) on responsiveness to the two stimuli in asthmatic subjects who had never previously received corticosteroid therapy. Drug (n = 13) or placebo (n = 12) were administered for 16 weeks. Responsiveness to bradykinin and methacholine was determined at baseline and at 4 week intervals. RESULTS: Placebo did not alter responsiveness to either stimulus compared to baseline. Fluticasone treatment significantly reduced responsiveness to bradykinin (P < 0.001 by Friedman anova) and methacholine (P = 0.02), but changes in responsiveness to bradykinin were significantly greater than those in methacholine responsiveness (P = 0.002). Bradykinin responsiveness was decreased at all treatment times compared to baseline, while methacholine responsiveness was not decreased until 8 weeks of therapy. When data were analyzed as changes from baseline (DeltaLog PD20), DeltaLog PD20 for methacholine was not different at any time-point between the two treatment groups. By contrast, DeltaLog PD20 for bradykinin was significantly greater in patients receiving fluticasone compared to those on placebo at all but the 16-week treatment time. Ten of 13 subjects receiving fluticasone failed, on at least one post-treatment visit, to show a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume (FEV1), even at the highest dose of bradykinin. CONCLUSIONS: Airways responsiveness to bradykinin is more profoundly, and more rapidly, reduced by inhaled glucocorticoids than is responsiveness to methacholine. Airways hyper-responsiveness to bradykinin provides a convenient and sensitive monitor of glucocorticoid responsiveness in asthma. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12190655/Airways_hyper_responsiveness_to_bradykinin_and_methacholine:_effects_of_inhaled_fluticasone_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0954-7894&amp;date=2002&amp;volume=32&amp;issue=8&amp;spage=1174 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -