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The role of salivary function in modulating chemotherapy-induced oropharyngeal mucositis: a review of the literature.

Abstract

Oropharyngeal mucositis is a common and significant complication of cancer chemotherapy and limits the delivery of chemotherapy, affects the quality of life, and increases the cost of care. Oral mucositis caused by cancer chemotherapy is associated with specific agents, but the origin of oral mucositis is poorly understood. These drugs may have direct toxic effects on the rapidly dividing cells of the oral mucosa and on cellular elements of the connective tissue. Microbial flora may play a role in the development of ulcerative mucositis. Chemotherapy may be directly toxic and affect the mucosa by systemic circulation and may be related to secretion of some chemotherapeutic drugs in the saliva, resulting in topical exposure to the oral environment. Other potential mechanisms include reduced saliva volume and change in saliva constituents that may affect epithelial maintenance and repair, the physiology of the oral microflora, and the interaction between the oral flora and the epithelium. Improved understanding of the mechanisms whereby specific chemotherapeutic agents cause mucositis may lead to management approaches that will reduce the incidence and severity of mucositis, improving quality of life and ensuring delivery of the necessary chemotherapy to improve cancer cure rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dentistry, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V5Z 1R9. jepstein@bccancer.bc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12193891

Citation

Epstein, Joel B., et al. "The Role of Salivary Function in Modulating Chemotherapy-induced Oropharyngeal Mucositis: a Review of the Literature." Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics, vol. 94, no. 1, 2002, pp. 39-44.
Epstein JB, Tsang AH, Warkentin D, et al. The role of salivary function in modulating chemotherapy-induced oropharyngeal mucositis: a review of the literature. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2002;94(1):39-44.
Epstein, J. B., Tsang, A. H., Warkentin, D., & Ship, J. A. (2002). The role of salivary function in modulating chemotherapy-induced oropharyngeal mucositis: a review of the literature. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics, 94(1), pp. 39-44.
Epstein JB, et al. The Role of Salivary Function in Modulating Chemotherapy-induced Oropharyngeal Mucositis: a Review of the Literature. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2002;94(1):39-44. PubMed PMID: 12193891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of salivary function in modulating chemotherapy-induced oropharyngeal mucositis: a review of the literature. AU - Epstein,Joel B, AU - Tsang,Andrew H F, AU - Warkentin,Dawn, AU - Ship,Jonathan A, PY - 2002/8/24/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/8/24/entrez SP - 39 EP - 44 JF - Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics JO - Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod VL - 94 IS - 1 N2 - Oropharyngeal mucositis is a common and significant complication of cancer chemotherapy and limits the delivery of chemotherapy, affects the quality of life, and increases the cost of care. Oral mucositis caused by cancer chemotherapy is associated with specific agents, but the origin of oral mucositis is poorly understood. These drugs may have direct toxic effects on the rapidly dividing cells of the oral mucosa and on cellular elements of the connective tissue. Microbial flora may play a role in the development of ulcerative mucositis. Chemotherapy may be directly toxic and affect the mucosa by systemic circulation and may be related to secretion of some chemotherapeutic drugs in the saliva, resulting in topical exposure to the oral environment. Other potential mechanisms include reduced saliva volume and change in saliva constituents that may affect epithelial maintenance and repair, the physiology of the oral microflora, and the interaction between the oral flora and the epithelium. Improved understanding of the mechanisms whereby specific chemotherapeutic agents cause mucositis may lead to management approaches that will reduce the incidence and severity of mucositis, improving quality of life and ensuring delivery of the necessary chemotherapy to improve cancer cure rates. SN - 1079-2104 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12193891/The_role_of_salivary_function_in_modulating_chemotherapy_induced_oropharyngeal_mucositis:_a_review_of_the_literature_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1079210402000471 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -