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Clinical course and the role of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in pediatric patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a prospective study.
J Infect Dis. 2002 Aug 15; 186(4):493-500.JI

Abstract

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is mainly associated with foodborne infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). From January 1997 through December 2000, 394 children with HUS were evaluated in a prospective multicenter surveillance study in Germany and Austria (incidences, 0.7/100,000 and 0.4/100,000 children <15 years old, respectively). Blood leukocytosis was associated with increased detection of STEC in stool cultures (P<.01) and a more severe disease course. Risk of death was associated with cerebral involvement (P<.01). Most strikingly, non-O157:H7 STEC were detected in 43% of stool cultures of patients with HUS: O26 was detected in 15%, sorbitol-fermenting O157:H(-) in 10%, O145 in 9%, O103 in 3%, and O111 in 43%. Patients with O157:H7 serotypes required dialysis for a longer time and had bloody diarrhea detected more frequently, compared with patients with non-O157:H7 serotypes (P<.05). This large study in children with HUS underlines the rising importance of non-O157:H7 serotypes, and, despite increased public awareness, the number of patients remained unchanged.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Zentrum für Kinderheilkunde und Jugendmedizin, Universität Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12195376

Citation

Gerber, Angela, et al. "Clinical Course and the Role of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Infection in the Hemolytic-uremic Syndrome in Pediatric Patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a Prospective Study." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 186, no. 4, 2002, pp. 493-500.
Gerber A, Karch H, Allerberger F, et al. Clinical course and the role of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in pediatric patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a prospective study. J Infect Dis. 2002;186(4):493-500.
Gerber, A., Karch, H., Allerberger, F., Verweyen, H. M., & Zimmerhackl, L. B. (2002). Clinical course and the role of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in pediatric patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a prospective study. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 186(4), 493-500.
Gerber A, et al. Clinical Course and the Role of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Infection in the Hemolytic-uremic Syndrome in Pediatric Patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a Prospective Study. J Infect Dis. 2002 Aug 15;186(4):493-500. PubMed PMID: 12195376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical course and the role of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in pediatric patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a prospective study. AU - Gerber,Angela, AU - Karch,Helge, AU - Allerberger,Franz, AU - Verweyen,Hege M, AU - Zimmerhackl,Lothar B, Y1 - 2002/08/02/ PY - 2002/02/04/received PY - 2002/04/12/revised PY - 2002/8/27/pubmed PY - 2002/9/18/medline PY - 2002/8/27/entrez SP - 493 EP - 500 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 186 IS - 4 N2 - Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is mainly associated with foodborne infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). From January 1997 through December 2000, 394 children with HUS were evaluated in a prospective multicenter surveillance study in Germany and Austria (incidences, 0.7/100,000 and 0.4/100,000 children <15 years old, respectively). Blood leukocytosis was associated with increased detection of STEC in stool cultures (P<.01) and a more severe disease course. Risk of death was associated with cerebral involvement (P<.01). Most strikingly, non-O157:H7 STEC were detected in 43% of stool cultures of patients with HUS: O26 was detected in 15%, sorbitol-fermenting O157:H(-) in 10%, O145 in 9%, O103 in 3%, and O111 in 43%. Patients with O157:H7 serotypes required dialysis for a longer time and had bloody diarrhea detected more frequently, compared with patients with non-O157:H7 serotypes (P<.05). This large study in children with HUS underlines the rising importance of non-O157:H7 serotypes, and, despite increased public awareness, the number of patients remained unchanged. SN - 0022-1899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12195376/Clinical_course_and_the_role_of_shiga_toxin_producing_Escherichia_coli_infection_in_the_hemolytic_uremic_syndrome_in_pediatric_patients_1997_2000_in_Germany_and_Austria:_a_prospective_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -