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A prospective cohort study on intake of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids and prostate cancer risk (Netherlands).
Cancer Causes Control 2002; 13(6):573-82CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The roles of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids as risk factors for prostate carcinoma are still questionable. We evaluated these in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

METHODS

The cohort study consisted of 58,279 men ages 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. After 6.3 years of follow-up, 642 incident prostate carcinoma cases were available for analysis. Intakes of retinol, vitamins C and E, and several carotenoids were measured by means of a 150-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

In multivariate analyses a positive association with prostate cancer risk was observed for intake of beta-cryptoxanthin. Rate ratios (RRs) in increasing quintiles were 1.00 (ref), 0.94, 1.01, 1.16, 1.41; p-trend < 0.01. For intake of retinol, vitamins C and E and other carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, and lutein/zeaxanthin) no effect on overall prostate cancer risk was found. RRs for vitamin supplement use were decreased, but not significantly. Among nondrinkers, nonsignificant inverse associations were observed for intake of retinol, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene (RRs, highest vs lowest quintile, were 0.23, 0.60, and 0.76, respectively). Among drinkers, beta-cryptoxanthin was positively associated (RR highest vs lowest quintile = 1.40).

CONCLUSIONS

These data show a positive association between beta-cryptoxanthin and prostate cancer risk. Our study also shows inverse associations for retinol, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene among nondrinkers; this suggests an interaction between vitamins and alcohol consumption, which needs confirmation. Lycopene was not associated with prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12195647

Citation

Schuurman, Agnes G., et al. "A Prospective Cohort Study On Intake of Retinol, Vitamins C and E, and Carotenoids and Prostate Cancer Risk (Netherlands)." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 13, no. 6, 2002, pp. 573-82.
Schuurman AG, Goldbohm RA, Brants HA, et al. A prospective cohort study on intake of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids and prostate cancer risk (Netherlands). Cancer Causes Control. 2002;13(6):573-82.
Schuurman, A. G., Goldbohm, R. A., Brants, H. A., & van den Brandt, P. A. (2002). A prospective cohort study on intake of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids and prostate cancer risk (Netherlands). Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 13(6), pp. 573-82.
Schuurman AG, et al. A Prospective Cohort Study On Intake of Retinol, Vitamins C and E, and Carotenoids and Prostate Cancer Risk (Netherlands). Cancer Causes Control. 2002;13(6):573-82. PubMed PMID: 12195647.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective cohort study on intake of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids and prostate cancer risk (Netherlands). AU - Schuurman,Agnes G, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - Brants,Henny A M, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, PY - 2002/8/28/pubmed PY - 2003/1/18/medline PY - 2002/8/28/entrez SP - 573 EP - 82 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The roles of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids as risk factors for prostate carcinoma are still questionable. We evaluated these in the Netherlands Cohort Study. METHODS: The cohort study consisted of 58,279 men ages 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. After 6.3 years of follow-up, 642 incident prostate carcinoma cases were available for analysis. Intakes of retinol, vitamins C and E, and several carotenoids were measured by means of a 150-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: In multivariate analyses a positive association with prostate cancer risk was observed for intake of beta-cryptoxanthin. Rate ratios (RRs) in increasing quintiles were 1.00 (ref), 0.94, 1.01, 1.16, 1.41; p-trend < 0.01. For intake of retinol, vitamins C and E and other carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, and lutein/zeaxanthin) no effect on overall prostate cancer risk was found. RRs for vitamin supplement use were decreased, but not significantly. Among nondrinkers, nonsignificant inverse associations were observed for intake of retinol, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene (RRs, highest vs lowest quintile, were 0.23, 0.60, and 0.76, respectively). Among drinkers, beta-cryptoxanthin was positively associated (RR highest vs lowest quintile = 1.40). CONCLUSIONS: These data show a positive association between beta-cryptoxanthin and prostate cancer risk. Our study also shows inverse associations for retinol, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene among nondrinkers; this suggests an interaction between vitamins and alcohol consumption, which needs confirmation. Lycopene was not associated with prostate cancer. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12195647/A_prospective_cohort_study_on_intake_of_retinol_vitamins_C_and_E_and_carotenoids_and_prostate_cancer_risk__Netherlands__ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=12195647.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -