Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Self-reported subjective perception of intoxication reflects family history of alcoholism when breath alcohol levels are constant.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2002; 26(8):1299-306AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The premise of this study is that the increased familial risk for alcoholism is associated with genetic determinants of the response to alcohol, characterized by sensitivity and adaptation. Following a single administration, sensitivity is the initial response to alcohol, expressed as the change in dependent measures from baseline. Adaptation of dependent measures within a single exposure to alcohol can be expressed as acute tolerance (recovery of dependent measures toward baseline values) or sensitization (movement of dependent measure further away from baseline values). This study tested the hypothesis that family history-positive (FHP) subjects are more sensitive and more adaptive to alcohol compared with family history-negative (FHN) subjects.

METHODS

The initial response and development of adaptation to alcohol were assessed by using self-reported subjective perceptions during a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) clamp of 60 mg%. The Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale, the Sensation Scale and a visual analog scale of intoxication were acquired at baseline, after the BrAC clamp was established, and after maintenance of the clamp for 105 min.

RESULTS

FHP subjects were more sensitive to alcohol compared with FHNs, as evidenced by greater changes in feelings of intoxication when the BrAC clamp was initially achieved. While the clamp was maintained, the FHP subjects adapted to the effects of alcohol and their perceptions of intoxication became indistinguishable from those of the FHN subjects. The FHP subjects had developed acute tolerance to alcohol, whereas the FHN subjects did not. Other self-reported perceptions of alcohol's effects did not distinguish between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS

A differential family history of alcoholism was reflected in self-reported subjective perceptions of intoxication when the brain's exposure to a specified concentration of alcohol was held constant (BrAC of 60 mg%). FHP subjects reported greater intoxication after alcohol and subsequently developed acute tolerance to alcohol compared with FHN subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, 791 Union Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202-4887, USA. smorzora@iupui.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12198408

Citation

Morzorati, Sandra L., et al. "Self-reported Subjective Perception of Intoxication Reflects Family History of Alcoholism when Breath Alcohol Levels Are Constant." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 26, no. 8, 2002, pp. 1299-306.
Morzorati SL, Ramchandani VA, Flury L, et al. Self-reported subjective perception of intoxication reflects family history of alcoholism when breath alcohol levels are constant. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002;26(8):1299-306.
Morzorati, S. L., Ramchandani, V. A., Flury, L., Li, T. K., & O'Connor, S. (2002). Self-reported subjective perception of intoxication reflects family history of alcoholism when breath alcohol levels are constant. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 26(8), pp. 1299-306.
Morzorati SL, et al. Self-reported Subjective Perception of Intoxication Reflects Family History of Alcoholism when Breath Alcohol Levels Are Constant. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002;26(8):1299-306. PubMed PMID: 12198408.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported subjective perception of intoxication reflects family history of alcoholism when breath alcohol levels are constant. AU - Morzorati,Sandra L, AU - Ramchandani,V A, AU - Flury,L, AU - Li,T-K, AU - O'Connor,S, PY - 2002/8/29/pubmed PY - 2003/2/4/medline PY - 2002/8/29/entrez SP - 1299 EP - 306 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 26 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: The premise of this study is that the increased familial risk for alcoholism is associated with genetic determinants of the response to alcohol, characterized by sensitivity and adaptation. Following a single administration, sensitivity is the initial response to alcohol, expressed as the change in dependent measures from baseline. Adaptation of dependent measures within a single exposure to alcohol can be expressed as acute tolerance (recovery of dependent measures toward baseline values) or sensitization (movement of dependent measure further away from baseline values). This study tested the hypothesis that family history-positive (FHP) subjects are more sensitive and more adaptive to alcohol compared with family history-negative (FHN) subjects. METHODS: The initial response and development of adaptation to alcohol were assessed by using self-reported subjective perceptions during a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) clamp of 60 mg%. The Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale, the Sensation Scale and a visual analog scale of intoxication were acquired at baseline, after the BrAC clamp was established, and after maintenance of the clamp for 105 min. RESULTS: FHP subjects were more sensitive to alcohol compared with FHNs, as evidenced by greater changes in feelings of intoxication when the BrAC clamp was initially achieved. While the clamp was maintained, the FHP subjects adapted to the effects of alcohol and their perceptions of intoxication became indistinguishable from those of the FHN subjects. The FHP subjects had developed acute tolerance to alcohol, whereas the FHN subjects did not. Other self-reported perceptions of alcohol's effects did not distinguish between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: A differential family history of alcoholism was reflected in self-reported subjective perceptions of intoxication when the brain's exposure to a specified concentration of alcohol was held constant (BrAC of 60 mg%). FHP subjects reported greater intoxication after alcohol and subsequently developed acute tolerance to alcohol compared with FHN subjects. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12198408/Self_reported_subjective_perception_of_intoxication_reflects_family_history_of_alcoholism_when_breath_alcohol_levels_are_constant_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=2002&volume=26&issue=8&spage=1299 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -