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Lack of effect of a low-fat, high-fruit, -vegetable, and -fiber diet on serum prostate-specific antigen of men without prostate cancer: results from a randomized trial.
J Clin Oncol 2002; 20(17):3592-8JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine whether a diet low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables, and fiber may be protective against prostate cancer by having an impact on serial levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA).

METHODS

Six hundred eighty-nine men were randomized to the intervention arm and 661 to the control arm. The intervention group received intensive counseling to consume a diet low in fat and high in fiber, fruits, and vegetables. The control group received a standard brochure on a healthy diet. PSA in serum was measured at baseline and annually thereafter for 4 years, and newly diagnosed prostate cancers were recorded.

RESULTS

The individual PSA slope for each participant was calculated, and the distributions of slopes were compared between the two groups. There was no significant difference in distributions of the slopes (P =.99). The two groups were identical in the proportions of participants with elevated PSA at each time point. There was no difference in the PSA slopes between the two groups (P =.34) and in the frequencies of elevated PSA values for those with elevated PSA at baseline. Incidence of prostate cancer during the 4 years was similar in the two groups (19 and 22 in the control and intervention arms, respectively).

CONCLUSION

Dietary intervention over a 4-year period with reduced fat and increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, and fiber has no impact on serum PSA levels in men. The study also offers no evidence that this dietary intervention over a 4-year period affects the incidence of prostate cancer during the 4 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, and National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. shikem@mskcc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12202659

Citation

Shike, Moshe, et al. "Lack of Effect of a Low-fat, High-fruit, -vegetable, and -fiber Diet On Serum Prostate-specific Antigen of Men Without Prostate Cancer: Results From a Randomized Trial." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 20, no. 17, 2002, pp. 3592-8.
Shike M, Latkany L, Riedel E, et al. Lack of effect of a low-fat, high-fruit, -vegetable, and -fiber diet on serum prostate-specific antigen of men without prostate cancer: results from a randomized trial. J Clin Oncol. 2002;20(17):3592-8.
Shike, M., Latkany, L., Riedel, E., Fleisher, M., Schatzkin, A., Lanza, E., ... Begg, C. B. (2002). Lack of effect of a low-fat, high-fruit, -vegetable, and -fiber diet on serum prostate-specific antigen of men without prostate cancer: results from a randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 20(17), pp. 3592-8.
Shike M, et al. Lack of Effect of a Low-fat, High-fruit, -vegetable, and -fiber Diet On Serum Prostate-specific Antigen of Men Without Prostate Cancer: Results From a Randomized Trial. J Clin Oncol. 2002 Sep 1;20(17):3592-8. PubMed PMID: 12202659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of effect of a low-fat, high-fruit, -vegetable, and -fiber diet on serum prostate-specific antigen of men without prostate cancer: results from a randomized trial. AU - Shike,Moshe, AU - Latkany,Lianne, AU - Riedel,Elyn, AU - Fleisher,Martin, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Lanza,Elaine, AU - Corle,Donald, AU - Begg,Colin B, PY - 2002/8/31/pubmed PY - 2002/9/19/medline PY - 2002/8/31/entrez SP - 3592 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology JO - J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 20 IS - 17 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine whether a diet low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables, and fiber may be protective against prostate cancer by having an impact on serial levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). METHODS: Six hundred eighty-nine men were randomized to the intervention arm and 661 to the control arm. The intervention group received intensive counseling to consume a diet low in fat and high in fiber, fruits, and vegetables. The control group received a standard brochure on a healthy diet. PSA in serum was measured at baseline and annually thereafter for 4 years, and newly diagnosed prostate cancers were recorded. RESULTS: The individual PSA slope for each participant was calculated, and the distributions of slopes were compared between the two groups. There was no significant difference in distributions of the slopes (P =.99). The two groups were identical in the proportions of participants with elevated PSA at each time point. There was no difference in the PSA slopes between the two groups (P =.34) and in the frequencies of elevated PSA values for those with elevated PSA at baseline. Incidence of prostate cancer during the 4 years was similar in the two groups (19 and 22 in the control and intervention arms, respectively). CONCLUSION: Dietary intervention over a 4-year period with reduced fat and increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, and fiber has no impact on serum PSA levels in men. The study also offers no evidence that this dietary intervention over a 4-year period affects the incidence of prostate cancer during the 4 years. SN - 0732-183X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12202659/Lack_of_effect_of_a_low_fat_high_fruit__vegetable_and__fiber_diet_on_serum_prostate_specific_antigen_of_men_without_prostate_cancer:_results_from_a_randomized_trial_ L2 - http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2002.02.040?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -