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Emerging epidemiology of bat-associated cryptic cases of rabies in humans in the United States.
Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Sep 15; 35(6):738-47.CI

Abstract

In the United States, during the past half-century, the number of humans to die of rabies dramatically decreased to an average of 1-2 per year. Although the number of deaths is low, most deaths occur because individuals are unaware that they had been exposed to and infected with rabies virus, and, therefore, they do not seek effective postexposure treatment. Molecular epidemiological studies have linked most of these cryptic rabies exposures to rabies virus variants associated with insectivorous bats. In particular, virus variants associated with 2 relatively reclusive species, the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) and the eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus), are the unexpected culprits of most cryptic cases of rabies in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA. smessenger@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12203172

Citation

Messenger, Sharon L., et al. "Emerging Epidemiology of Bat-associated Cryptic Cases of Rabies in Humans in the United States." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 35, no. 6, 2002, pp. 738-47.
Messenger SL, Smith JS, Rupprecht CE. Emerging epidemiology of bat-associated cryptic cases of rabies in humans in the United States. Clin Infect Dis. 2002;35(6):738-47.
Messenger, S. L., Smith, J. S., & Rupprecht, C. E. (2002). Emerging epidemiology of bat-associated cryptic cases of rabies in humans in the United States. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 35(6), 738-47.
Messenger SL, Smith JS, Rupprecht CE. Emerging Epidemiology of Bat-associated Cryptic Cases of Rabies in Humans in the United States. Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Sep 15;35(6):738-47. PubMed PMID: 12203172.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emerging epidemiology of bat-associated cryptic cases of rabies in humans in the United States. AU - Messenger,Sharon L, AU - Smith,Jean S, AU - Rupprecht,Charles E, Y1 - 2002/08/28/ PY - 2001/11/05/received PY - 2002/05/30/revised PY - 2002/8/31/pubmed PY - 2002/9/21/medline PY - 2002/8/31/entrez SP - 738 EP - 47 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 35 IS - 6 N2 - In the United States, during the past half-century, the number of humans to die of rabies dramatically decreased to an average of 1-2 per year. Although the number of deaths is low, most deaths occur because individuals are unaware that they had been exposed to and infected with rabies virus, and, therefore, they do not seek effective postexposure treatment. Molecular epidemiological studies have linked most of these cryptic rabies exposures to rabies virus variants associated with insectivorous bats. In particular, virus variants associated with 2 relatively reclusive species, the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) and the eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus), are the unexpected culprits of most cryptic cases of rabies in humans. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12203172/Emerging_epidemiology_of_bat_associated_cryptic_cases_of_rabies_in_humans_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/342387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -