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Effects of dietary lipids on immune function in a murine sensitisation model.
Br J Nutr 2002; 88(3):291-9BJ

Abstract

We have tested the effect of dietary fatty acids on aspects of innate and specific adaptive T helper (Th) 1- and Th2-driven immune responses in a murine sensitisation model using dinitrochlorobenzene as sensitiser. Six groups of fifteen BALB/c mice were fed diets containing 30 % fat (by energy) for 8 weeks. Diets were rich in saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), or n-3 PUFA, each at a sufficient (11, 35 and 68 mg/kg) and a supplemented vitamin E level (1028, 1031 and 1030 mg/kg respectively). Feeding n-6 PUFA marginally decreased % phagocytosing cells at the low vitamin E level, but had no other effects on immune function. The n-3 PUFA diets decreased production of prostaglandin E2 while increasing oxidative burst and tumour necrosis factor alpha production. In addition adaptive Th1-driven responses (immunoglobulin, Ig)G2a, IgG2b, interferon-gamma:interleukin 4) were decreased, whereas Th2-driven and mucosal immune responses were increased (IgE) or unaffected (IgG1, IgA). Combination with high levels of alpha-tocopherol did not affect the reduced prostaglandin E2 production, augmented the increase of tumour necrosis factor alpha production and tended to ameliorate the selective suppressive effects of n-3 PUFA on certain Th1-driven effects (interferon-gamma:interleukin 4 ratio and IgG2a levels). We conclude that the sensitisation model appears useful for application in nutrition research. It allows a broad assessment of the effects of dietary intervention on various aspects of immune responsiveness, and as such provides a valuable model to assess, characterise and rank effects of foods and/or nutrients on a range of immune functions, including Th1-Th2 polarisation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unilever Health Institute, P.O. Box 114, 3130 AC Vlaardingen, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12207839

Citation

Albers, Ruud, et al. "Effects of Dietary Lipids On Immune Function in a Murine Sensitisation Model." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 88, no. 3, 2002, pp. 291-9.
Albers R, Bol M, Bleumink R, et al. Effects of dietary lipids on immune function in a murine sensitisation model. Br J Nutr. 2002;88(3):291-9.
Albers, R., Bol, M., Bleumink, R., Willems, A., Blonk, C., & Pieters, R. (2002). Effects of dietary lipids on immune function in a murine sensitisation model. The British Journal of Nutrition, 88(3), pp. 291-9.
Albers R, et al. Effects of Dietary Lipids On Immune Function in a Murine Sensitisation Model. Br J Nutr. 2002;88(3):291-9. PubMed PMID: 12207839.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary lipids on immune function in a murine sensitisation model. AU - Albers,Ruud, AU - Bol,Marianne, AU - Bleumink,Rob, AU - Willems,Astrid, AU - Blonk,Cor, AU - Pieters,Raymond, PY - 2002/9/5/pubmed PY - 2002/10/2/medline PY - 2002/9/5/entrez SP - 291 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 88 IS - 3 N2 - We have tested the effect of dietary fatty acids on aspects of innate and specific adaptive T helper (Th) 1- and Th2-driven immune responses in a murine sensitisation model using dinitrochlorobenzene as sensitiser. Six groups of fifteen BALB/c mice were fed diets containing 30 % fat (by energy) for 8 weeks. Diets were rich in saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), or n-3 PUFA, each at a sufficient (11, 35 and 68 mg/kg) and a supplemented vitamin E level (1028, 1031 and 1030 mg/kg respectively). Feeding n-6 PUFA marginally decreased % phagocytosing cells at the low vitamin E level, but had no other effects on immune function. The n-3 PUFA diets decreased production of prostaglandin E2 while increasing oxidative burst and tumour necrosis factor alpha production. In addition adaptive Th1-driven responses (immunoglobulin, Ig)G2a, IgG2b, interferon-gamma:interleukin 4) were decreased, whereas Th2-driven and mucosal immune responses were increased (IgE) or unaffected (IgG1, IgA). Combination with high levels of alpha-tocopherol did not affect the reduced prostaglandin E2 production, augmented the increase of tumour necrosis factor alpha production and tended to ameliorate the selective suppressive effects of n-3 PUFA on certain Th1-driven effects (interferon-gamma:interleukin 4 ratio and IgG2a levels). We conclude that the sensitisation model appears useful for application in nutrition research. It allows a broad assessment of the effects of dietary intervention on various aspects of immune responsiveness, and as such provides a valuable model to assess, characterise and rank effects of foods and/or nutrients on a range of immune functions, including Th1-Th2 polarisation. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12207839/Effects_of_dietary_lipids_on_immune_function_in_a_murine_sensitisation_model_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114502001678/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -