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Cross-sectional association between total level and type of alcohol consumption and glycosylated haemoglobin level: the EPIC-Norfolk Study.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Sep; 56(9):882-90.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the association between total level and type of alcohol consumed and glycaemia.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

The EPIC-Norfolk Study, a population-based cohort study of diet and chronic disease.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Non-diabetic men (n=2842) and women (n=3572), aged 40-78 y. Alcohol intake was assessed by self-reported questionnaire, and glycaemia measured by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)).

RESULTS

Ten percent of men and 18% of women reported drinking no alcohol. Among drinkers, median alcohol intake was 8 units/week for men and 3 units/week for women. In analyses stratified by sex and adjusted for age, total energy intake, education, fruit and vegetable intake, smoking, family history of diabetes, physical activity, body mass index and waist:hip ratio, alcohol intake was inversely associated with HbA(1c) in men and women, although the association was stronger in women. A 1 unit/week increase in alcohol intake was associated with 0.0049% (s.e.=0.00223; P-value=0.028) and 0.017% (s.e.=0.00343; P-value <0.001) reduction in HbA(1c) in men and women respectively. In similar multivariate analyses, wine intake was inversely associated with HbA(1c) in men, and wine, spirits and beer intake were inversely associated with HbA(1c) in women. When also adjusted for total alcohol intake, only the association between wine intake and HbA(1c) in men remained significant.

CONCLUSION

Alcohol intake was associated with lower HbA(1c) level, an association not explained by confounding. The distinction between type of alcohol consumed was particularly important in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12209377

Citation

Harding, A-H, et al. "Cross-sectional Association Between Total Level and Type of Alcohol Consumption and Glycosylated Haemoglobin Level: the EPIC-Norfolk Study." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 56, no. 9, 2002, pp. 882-90.
Harding AH, Sargeant LA, Khaw KT, et al. Cross-sectional association between total level and type of alcohol consumption and glycosylated haemoglobin level: the EPIC-Norfolk Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002;56(9):882-90.
Harding, A. H., Sargeant, L. A., Khaw, K. T., Welch, A., Oakes, S., Luben, R. N., Bingham, S., Day, N. E., & Wareham, N. J. (2002). Cross-sectional association between total level and type of alcohol consumption and glycosylated haemoglobin level: the EPIC-Norfolk Study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56(9), 882-90.
Harding AH, et al. Cross-sectional Association Between Total Level and Type of Alcohol Consumption and Glycosylated Haemoglobin Level: the EPIC-Norfolk Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002;56(9):882-90. PubMed PMID: 12209377.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cross-sectional association between total level and type of alcohol consumption and glycosylated haemoglobin level: the EPIC-Norfolk Study. AU - Harding,A-H, AU - Sargeant,L A, AU - Khaw,K-T, AU - Welch,A, AU - Oakes,S, AU - Luben,R N, AU - Bingham,S, AU - Day,N E, AU - Wareham,N J, PY - 2001/07/18/received PY - 2001/12/11/revised PY - 2001/12/14/accepted PY - 2002/9/5/pubmed PY - 2002/11/28/medline PY - 2002/9/5/entrez SP - 882 EP - 90 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 56 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between total level and type of alcohol consumed and glycaemia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: The EPIC-Norfolk Study, a population-based cohort study of diet and chronic disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Non-diabetic men (n=2842) and women (n=3572), aged 40-78 y. Alcohol intake was assessed by self-reported questionnaire, and glycaemia measured by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)). RESULTS: Ten percent of men and 18% of women reported drinking no alcohol. Among drinkers, median alcohol intake was 8 units/week for men and 3 units/week for women. In analyses stratified by sex and adjusted for age, total energy intake, education, fruit and vegetable intake, smoking, family history of diabetes, physical activity, body mass index and waist:hip ratio, alcohol intake was inversely associated with HbA(1c) in men and women, although the association was stronger in women. A 1 unit/week increase in alcohol intake was associated with 0.0049% (s.e.=0.00223; P-value=0.028) and 0.017% (s.e.=0.00343; P-value <0.001) reduction in HbA(1c) in men and women respectively. In similar multivariate analyses, wine intake was inversely associated with HbA(1c) in men, and wine, spirits and beer intake were inversely associated with HbA(1c) in women. When also adjusted for total alcohol intake, only the association between wine intake and HbA(1c) in men remained significant. CONCLUSION: Alcohol intake was associated with lower HbA(1c) level, an association not explained by confounding. The distinction between type of alcohol consumed was particularly important in men. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12209377/Cross_sectional_association_between_total_level_and_type_of_alcohol_consumption_and_glycosylated_haemoglobin_level:_the_EPIC_Norfolk_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601408 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -