Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Microalbuminuria in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: evidence with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for treating early and preventing clinical nephropathy.
Curr Hypertens Rep 2002; 4(5):387-93CH

Abstract

A cumulative incidence of diabetic nephropathy of 25% to 40% has been documented after duration of diabetes of at least 25 years in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic nephropathy has become the leading cause (25%-44%) of end-stage renal failure in Europe, the United States, and Japan. Until the early 1980s, no renoprotective treatment was available for use in diabetic nephropathy. Death occurred on average 5 to 7 years after the onset of persistent proteinuria. The two main treatment strategies for prevention of diabetic nephropathy are improved glycemic control and blood pressure lowering, particularly using drugs blocking the renin-angiotensin system. Megatrials and meta-analyses have clearly demonstrated the beneficial effect of both the above-mentioned treatment modalities. Secondary prevention, that is, treatment modalities applied to diabetic patients at high risk for developing diabetic nephropathy (eg, those with microalbuminuria) has been documented, applying angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockade. The renoprotective effects of these drugs are independent of their beneficial reduction in blood pressure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 2, DK-2820 Gentofte, Denmark. hhparving@dadlnet.dkNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12217258

Citation

Parving, Hans-Henrik, and Peter Hovind. "Microalbuminuria in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence With Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers for Treating Early and Preventing Clinical Nephropathy." Current Hypertension Reports, vol. 4, no. 5, 2002, pp. 387-93.
Parving HH, Hovind P. Microalbuminuria in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: evidence with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for treating early and preventing clinical nephropathy. Curr Hypertens Rep. 2002;4(5):387-93.
Parving, H. H., & Hovind, P. (2002). Microalbuminuria in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: evidence with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for treating early and preventing clinical nephropathy. Current Hypertension Reports, 4(5), pp. 387-93.
Parving HH, Hovind P. Microalbuminuria in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence With Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers for Treating Early and Preventing Clinical Nephropathy. Curr Hypertens Rep. 2002;4(5):387-93. PubMed PMID: 12217258.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microalbuminuria in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: evidence with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for treating early and preventing clinical nephropathy. AU - Parving,Hans-Henrik, AU - Hovind,Peter, PY - 2002/9/10/pubmed PY - 2002/11/28/medline PY - 2002/9/10/entrez SP - 387 EP - 93 JF - Current hypertension reports JO - Curr. Hypertens. Rep. VL - 4 IS - 5 N2 - A cumulative incidence of diabetic nephropathy of 25% to 40% has been documented after duration of diabetes of at least 25 years in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic nephropathy has become the leading cause (25%-44%) of end-stage renal failure in Europe, the United States, and Japan. Until the early 1980s, no renoprotective treatment was available for use in diabetic nephropathy. Death occurred on average 5 to 7 years after the onset of persistent proteinuria. The two main treatment strategies for prevention of diabetic nephropathy are improved glycemic control and blood pressure lowering, particularly using drugs blocking the renin-angiotensin system. Megatrials and meta-analyses have clearly demonstrated the beneficial effect of both the above-mentioned treatment modalities. Secondary prevention, that is, treatment modalities applied to diabetic patients at high risk for developing diabetic nephropathy (eg, those with microalbuminuria) has been documented, applying angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockade. The renoprotective effects of these drugs are independent of their beneficial reduction in blood pressure. SN - 1522-6417 UR - http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12217258/full_citation L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/8215 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -