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Body mass index, height, and the risk of ovarian cancer mortality in a prospective cohort of postmenopausal women.

Abstract

Endogenous hormones may play a role in ovarian carcinogenesis. Postmenopausal obesity, although associated with higher circulating levels of estrogen and androgens, has not been linked consistently to ovarian cancer. The present study examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), height, and ovarian cancer mortality among postmenopausal women in a large prospective mortality study of 300,537 women who were cancer free at enrollment in 1982 and had no history of hysterectomy or ovarian surgery. During 16 years of follow-up, 1,511 deaths occurred from ovarian cancer. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to compute rate ratios (RRs) and to adjust for confounders. Ovarian cancer mortality rates were higher among overweight [BMI >/=25;RR, 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.30] and obese women (BMI >/=30; RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.07-1.48) compared with women with BMI <25. Use of postmenopausal estrogens modified the association between BMI and ovarian cancer mortality (P = 0.05). The increased risk associated with obesity (BMI >/=30) was limited to women who never used postmenopausal estrogens (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.12-1.66) and was not seen among ever users (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.62-1.41). Height was positively associated with ovarian cancer mortality. Compared with women 152-156 cm tall, ovarian cancer mortality rates were lowest for the shortest women (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.47-1.10 for women <152 cm) and highest for the tallest (RR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.95-2.09 for women >/=177 cm). In this study, obesity and height appear to be independently associated with ovarian cancer mortality. The 36% increase in risk associated with obesity among women who had never used postmenopausal estrogens may have important public health implications because obesity is a growing problem in the United States.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia 30329-4251, USA. crodrigu@cancer.org

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    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Body Height
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Obesity
    Ovarian Neoplasms
    Postmenopause
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12223425

    Citation

    Rodriguez, Carmen, et al. "Body Mass Index, Height, and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Mortality in a Prospective Cohort of Postmenopausal Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 11, no. 9, 2002, pp. 822-8.
    Rodriguez C, Calle EE, Fakhrabadi-Shokoohi D, et al. Body mass index, height, and the risk of ovarian cancer mortality in a prospective cohort of postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(9):822-8.
    Rodriguez, C., Calle, E. E., Fakhrabadi-Shokoohi, D., Jacobs, E. J., & Thun, M. J. (2002). Body mass index, height, and the risk of ovarian cancer mortality in a prospective cohort of postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 11(9), pp. 822-8.
    Rodriguez C, et al. Body Mass Index, Height, and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Mortality in a Prospective Cohort of Postmenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(9):822-8. PubMed PMID: 12223425.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index, height, and the risk of ovarian cancer mortality in a prospective cohort of postmenopausal women. AU - Rodriguez,Carmen, AU - Calle,Eugenia E, AU - Fakhrabadi-Shokoohi,Dorna, AU - Jacobs,Eric J, AU - Thun,Michael J, PY - 2002/9/12/pubmed PY - 2003/2/26/medline PY - 2002/9/12/entrez SP - 822 EP - 8 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 11 IS - 9 N2 - Endogenous hormones may play a role in ovarian carcinogenesis. Postmenopausal obesity, although associated with higher circulating levels of estrogen and androgens, has not been linked consistently to ovarian cancer. The present study examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), height, and ovarian cancer mortality among postmenopausal women in a large prospective mortality study of 300,537 women who were cancer free at enrollment in 1982 and had no history of hysterectomy or ovarian surgery. During 16 years of follow-up, 1,511 deaths occurred from ovarian cancer. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to compute rate ratios (RRs) and to adjust for confounders. Ovarian cancer mortality rates were higher among overweight [BMI >/=25;RR, 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.30] and obese women (BMI >/=30; RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.07-1.48) compared with women with BMI <25. Use of postmenopausal estrogens modified the association between BMI and ovarian cancer mortality (P = 0.05). The increased risk associated with obesity (BMI >/=30) was limited to women who never used postmenopausal estrogens (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.12-1.66) and was not seen among ever users (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.62-1.41). Height was positively associated with ovarian cancer mortality. Compared with women 152-156 cm tall, ovarian cancer mortality rates were lowest for the shortest women (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.47-1.10 for women <152 cm) and highest for the tallest (RR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.95-2.09 for women >/=177 cm). In this study, obesity and height appear to be independently associated with ovarian cancer mortality. The 36% increase in risk associated with obesity among women who had never used postmenopausal estrogens may have important public health implications because obesity is a growing problem in the United States. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12223425/Body_mass_index_height_and_the_risk_of_ovarian_cancer_mortality_in_a_prospective_cohort_of_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=12223425 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -