Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Analysis of obesity and hyperinsulinemia in the development of metabolic syndrome: San Antonio Heart Study.
Obes Res. 2002 Sep; 10(9):923-31.OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To use standardized cut-offs of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and fasting insulin levels to predict the development of metabolic disorders and metabolic syndrome.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

We performed an 8-year follow-up study of 628 non-Hispanic whites and 1340 Mexican Americans, ages 25 to 64 years, from the second cohort of the San Antonio Heart Study. We defined metabolic disorders as dyslipidemia (triglycerides > or =2.26 mM or high-density lipoprotein <0.91 mM in men and <1.17 mM in women), hypertension (blood pressure > or =140 or >=90 mm Hg, or receiving antihypertensive medications), and type 2 diabetes (fasting glucose > or =7.0 mM, 2-hour test glucose > or =11.1 mM, or receiving anti-diabetic medications). People with at least two metabolic disorders were defined as having metabolic syndrome.

RESULTS

High waist-to-hip ratio and fasting insulin levels were significant predictors of developing metabolic syndrome. High anthropometric indices remained significant predictors of metabolic syndrome after adjusting for fasting insulin. Waist circumference, BMI, and insulin had similar areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.74 to 0.76). Further multivariate analyses combining these indices showed minimal increase in prediction. Of subjects who had a combination of high BMI (> or =30 kg/m(2)) and high waist circumference (above "Action Level 2"), 32% developed metabolic syndrome, compared with 10% of subjects with both low BMI and low waist circumference.

DISCUSSION

These findings support the National Institutes of Health recommendations for reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome. Adjustment for baseline fasting insulin levels had only a small effect on the ability of anthropometric indices to predict the metabolic syndrome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cambridge Clinical School, Cambridge, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12226141

Citation

Han, Thang S., et al. "Analysis of Obesity and Hyperinsulinemia in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome: San Antonio Heart Study." Obesity Research, vol. 10, no. 9, 2002, pp. 923-31.
Han TS, Williams K, Sattar N, et al. Analysis of obesity and hyperinsulinemia in the development of metabolic syndrome: San Antonio Heart Study. Obes Res. 2002;10(9):923-31.
Han, T. S., Williams, K., Sattar, N., Hunt, K. J., Lean, M. E., & Haffner, S. M. (2002). Analysis of obesity and hyperinsulinemia in the development of metabolic syndrome: San Antonio Heart Study. Obesity Research, 10(9), 923-31.
Han TS, et al. Analysis of Obesity and Hyperinsulinemia in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome: San Antonio Heart Study. Obes Res. 2002;10(9):923-31. PubMed PMID: 12226141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of obesity and hyperinsulinemia in the development of metabolic syndrome: San Antonio Heart Study. AU - Han,Thang S, AU - Williams,Ken, AU - Sattar,Naveed, AU - Hunt,Kelly J, AU - Lean,Michael E J, AU - Haffner,Steven M, PY - 2002/9/13/pubmed PY - 2003/2/11/medline PY - 2002/9/13/entrez SP - 923 EP - 31 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes Res VL - 10 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To use standardized cut-offs of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and fasting insulin levels to predict the development of metabolic disorders and metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We performed an 8-year follow-up study of 628 non-Hispanic whites and 1340 Mexican Americans, ages 25 to 64 years, from the second cohort of the San Antonio Heart Study. We defined metabolic disorders as dyslipidemia (triglycerides > or =2.26 mM or high-density lipoprotein <0.91 mM in men and <1.17 mM in women), hypertension (blood pressure > or =140 or >=90 mm Hg, or receiving antihypertensive medications), and type 2 diabetes (fasting glucose > or =7.0 mM, 2-hour test glucose > or =11.1 mM, or receiving anti-diabetic medications). People with at least two metabolic disorders were defined as having metabolic syndrome. RESULTS: High waist-to-hip ratio and fasting insulin levels were significant predictors of developing metabolic syndrome. High anthropometric indices remained significant predictors of metabolic syndrome after adjusting for fasting insulin. Waist circumference, BMI, and insulin had similar areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.74 to 0.76). Further multivariate analyses combining these indices showed minimal increase in prediction. Of subjects who had a combination of high BMI (> or =30 kg/m(2)) and high waist circumference (above "Action Level 2"), 32% developed metabolic syndrome, compared with 10% of subjects with both low BMI and low waist circumference. DISCUSSION: These findings support the National Institutes of Health recommendations for reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome. Adjustment for baseline fasting insulin levels had only a small effect on the ability of anthropometric indices to predict the metabolic syndrome. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12226141/Analysis_of_obesity_and_hyperinsulinemia_in_the_development_of_metabolic_syndrome:_San_Antonio_Heart_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2002.126 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -