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Measurement of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of recall contact and delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans.
Methods. 2002 Sep; 28(1):34-45.M

Abstract

This article describes methodology used for assessment of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of recall responses in humans. Nickel allergy is common in the general population and patch testing of nickel-allergic volunteers provides a convenient model of contact hypersensitivity. Similarly, Mantoux-positive volunteers, recruited from within hospital staff, are used as a model for delayed-type hypersensitivity. Use of secondary rather than primary immune responses allows placement of multiple test sites on each volunteer. Further, each volunteer acts as his or her own unirradiated control. This enables UV immunosuppression to be studied with relatively few human volunteers, and makes determination of UV immunosuppression dose responses feasible in human subjects. The method can also be used for assessment of the level of immune protection afforded by agents such as sunscreens or biologically active substances.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine (Dermatology), Melanoma and Skin Cancer Research Institute, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital at the University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. garyh@med.usyd.edu.auNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12231186

Citation

Damian, Diona L., and Gary M. Halliday. "Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Suppression of Recall Contact and Delayed-type Hypersensitivity in Humans." Methods (San Diego, Calif.), vol. 28, no. 1, 2002, pp. 34-45.
Damian DL, Halliday GM. Measurement of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of recall contact and delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans. Methods. 2002;28(1):34-45.
Damian, D. L., & Halliday, G. M. (2002). Measurement of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of recall contact and delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans. Methods (San Diego, Calif.), 28(1), 34-45.
Damian DL, Halliday GM. Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Suppression of Recall Contact and Delayed-type Hypersensitivity in Humans. Methods. 2002;28(1):34-45. PubMed PMID: 12231186.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measurement of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of recall contact and delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans. AU - Damian,Diona L, AU - Halliday,Gary M, PY - 2002/9/17/pubmed PY - 2003/3/5/medline PY - 2002/9/17/entrez SP - 34 EP - 45 JF - Methods (San Diego, Calif.) JO - Methods VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - This article describes methodology used for assessment of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of recall responses in humans. Nickel allergy is common in the general population and patch testing of nickel-allergic volunteers provides a convenient model of contact hypersensitivity. Similarly, Mantoux-positive volunteers, recruited from within hospital staff, are used as a model for delayed-type hypersensitivity. Use of secondary rather than primary immune responses allows placement of multiple test sites on each volunteer. Further, each volunteer acts as his or her own unirradiated control. This enables UV immunosuppression to be studied with relatively few human volunteers, and makes determination of UV immunosuppression dose responses feasible in human subjects. The method can also be used for assessment of the level of immune protection afforded by agents such as sunscreens or biologically active substances. SN - 1046-2023 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12231186/Measurement_of_ultraviolet_radiation_induced_suppression_of_recall_contact_and_delayed_type_hypersensitivity_in_humans_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -