Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of pelvic floor muscle training on strength and predictors of response in the treatment of urinary incontinence.
Neurourol Urodyn 2002; 21(5):486-90NU

Abstract

AIMS

The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the effect of training on pelvic floor muscle strength; (2) to determine whether changes in pelvic floor muscle strength correlate with changes in continence; and (3) to determine whether demographic characteristics, clinical incontinence severity indices, or urodynamic measures predict response to pelvic floor muscle training.

METHODS

One hundred thirty-four women with urinary incontinence (95=genuine stress incontinence [GSI]; 19=detrusor instability [DI]; 20=mixed incontinence [GSI+DI]) were randomized to pelvic floor muscle training (n=67) or bladder training (n=67). Urinary diaries, urodynamic evaluation, and vaginal pressure measurements by using balloon manometry were performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy. Primary outcome measures consisted of incontinent episodes per week and vaginal pressure measurements.

RESULTS

Both treatment groups had a reduction in incontinent episodes (P</=0.004). Vaginal pressures increased more with pelvic floor muscle training than with bladder training (P=0.0003). Other than a weak correlation between a reduction in incontinent episodes/week and an increase in maximum sustained vaginal pressure in women with GSI (r=0.32, P=0.04), there were no significant correlations between increases in pelvic floor muscle strength and improvement in continence status. There were no significant correlations between baseline demographic characteristics, clinical incontinence severity, or urodynamic measures and increases in vaginal pressure or improvement in clinical severity after pelvic floor muscle training.

CONCLUSIONS

Pelvic floor muscle training improves continence and increases vaginal pressure measurements, but the direct correlations between these alterations are weak. A woman's response to behavioral treatment does not depend on her demographic characteristics, clinical incontinence severity, urodynamic measures, or initial pelvic floor muscle strength.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. theo@orca.mtn.ncahe.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12232886

Citation

Theofrastous, J P., et al. "Effects of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training On Strength and Predictors of Response in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence." Neurourology and Urodynamics, vol. 21, no. 5, 2002, pp. 486-90.
Theofrastous JP, Wyman JF, Bump RC, et al. Effects of pelvic floor muscle training on strength and predictors of response in the treatment of urinary incontinence. Neurourol Urodyn. 2002;21(5):486-90.
Theofrastous, J. P., Wyman, J. F., Bump, R. C., McClish, D. K., Elser, D. M., Bland, D. R., & Fantl, J. A. (2002). Effects of pelvic floor muscle training on strength and predictors of response in the treatment of urinary incontinence. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 21(5), pp. 486-90.
Theofrastous JP, et al. Effects of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training On Strength and Predictors of Response in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence. Neurourol Urodyn. 2002;21(5):486-90. PubMed PMID: 12232886.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of pelvic floor muscle training on strength and predictors of response in the treatment of urinary incontinence. AU - Theofrastous,J P, AU - Wyman,J F, AU - Bump,R C, AU - McClish,D K, AU - Elser,D M, AU - Bland,D R, AU - Fantl,J A, PY - 2002/9/17/pubmed PY - 2003/2/22/medline PY - 2002/9/17/entrez SP - 486 EP - 90 JF - Neurourology and urodynamics JO - Neurourol. Urodyn. VL - 21 IS - 5 N2 - AIMS: The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the effect of training on pelvic floor muscle strength; (2) to determine whether changes in pelvic floor muscle strength correlate with changes in continence; and (3) to determine whether demographic characteristics, clinical incontinence severity indices, or urodynamic measures predict response to pelvic floor muscle training. METHODS: One hundred thirty-four women with urinary incontinence (95=genuine stress incontinence [GSI]; 19=detrusor instability [DI]; 20=mixed incontinence [GSI+DI]) were randomized to pelvic floor muscle training (n=67) or bladder training (n=67). Urinary diaries, urodynamic evaluation, and vaginal pressure measurements by using balloon manometry were performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy. Primary outcome measures consisted of incontinent episodes per week and vaginal pressure measurements. RESULTS: Both treatment groups had a reduction in incontinent episodes (P</=0.004). Vaginal pressures increased more with pelvic floor muscle training than with bladder training (P=0.0003). Other than a weak correlation between a reduction in incontinent episodes/week and an increase in maximum sustained vaginal pressure in women with GSI (r=0.32, P=0.04), there were no significant correlations between increases in pelvic floor muscle strength and improvement in continence status. There were no significant correlations between baseline demographic characteristics, clinical incontinence severity, or urodynamic measures and increases in vaginal pressure or improvement in clinical severity after pelvic floor muscle training. CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic floor muscle training improves continence and increases vaginal pressure measurements, but the direct correlations between these alterations are weak. A woman's response to behavioral treatment does not depend on her demographic characteristics, clinical incontinence severity, urodynamic measures, or initial pelvic floor muscle strength. SN - 0733-2467 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12232886/Effects_of_pelvic_floor_muscle_training_on_strength_and_predictors_of_response_in_the_treatment_of_urinary_incontinence_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.10021 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -