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The effect of different diets on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation in healthy subjects.
Eur Urol 2002; 42(3):289-96EU

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of the study was to determine the impact of defined diet modifications on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation.

METHODS

Ten healthy male volunteers consumed a self-selected diet (SD) for 14 days, and three different standard diets for a period of 5 days each. Whereas the western-type diet (WD) is representative of the usual dietary habits, the normal mixed diet (ND) and the ovo-lacto-vegetarian diet (VD) were calculated according to the requirements.

RESULTS

The risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation, calculated as relative supersaturation (EQUIL2) from urine composition, was highest during ingestion of diets SD and WD. The intake of diet ND resulted in a significant decrease in relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate by 58% (p<0.05) compared with diet WD, due to a significant decline in urinary calcium and uric acid excretion and a significant increase in urinary volume, pH-value and citrate excretion. In spite of an increase in urinary pH, citrate and magnesium excretion and a decline in calcium excretion, no further significant decrease in the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation was observed on diet VD, due to a significant increase in urinary oxalate by 30% (p<0.05) on average.

CONCLUSIONS

The change of usual dietary habits for a normal mixed diet significantly reduces the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation. With a vegetarian diet a similar decline in urinary supersaturation with calcium oxalate can be achieved compared to a normal mixed diet. Since urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly, a vegetarian diet without adequate intake of calcium may not be recommended to patients with mild hyperoxaluria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Experimental Urology, Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Street, 25, D-53105, Bonn, Germany. roswitha.siener@ukb.uni-bonn.de

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12234515

Citation

Siener, Roswitha, and Albrecht Hesse. "The Effect of Different Diets On Urine Composition and the Risk of Calcium Oxalate Crystallisation in Healthy Subjects." European Urology, vol. 42, no. 3, 2002, pp. 289-96.
Siener R, Hesse A. The effect of different diets on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation in healthy subjects. Eur Urol. 2002;42(3):289-96.
Siener, R., & Hesse, A. (2002). The effect of different diets on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation in healthy subjects. European Urology, 42(3), pp. 289-96.
Siener R, Hesse A. The Effect of Different Diets On Urine Composition and the Risk of Calcium Oxalate Crystallisation in Healthy Subjects. Eur Urol. 2002;42(3):289-96. PubMed PMID: 12234515.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of different diets on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation in healthy subjects. AU - Siener,Roswitha, AU - Hesse,Albrecht, PY - 2002/9/18/pubmed PY - 2003/1/15/medline PY - 2002/9/18/entrez SP - 289 EP - 96 JF - European urology JO - Eur. Urol. VL - 42 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine the impact of defined diet modifications on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation. METHODS: Ten healthy male volunteers consumed a self-selected diet (SD) for 14 days, and three different standard diets for a period of 5 days each. Whereas the western-type diet (WD) is representative of the usual dietary habits, the normal mixed diet (ND) and the ovo-lacto-vegetarian diet (VD) were calculated according to the requirements. RESULTS: The risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation, calculated as relative supersaturation (EQUIL2) from urine composition, was highest during ingestion of diets SD and WD. The intake of diet ND resulted in a significant decrease in relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate by 58% (p<0.05) compared with diet WD, due to a significant decline in urinary calcium and uric acid excretion and a significant increase in urinary volume, pH-value and citrate excretion. In spite of an increase in urinary pH, citrate and magnesium excretion and a decline in calcium excretion, no further significant decrease in the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation was observed on diet VD, due to a significant increase in urinary oxalate by 30% (p<0.05) on average. CONCLUSIONS: The change of usual dietary habits for a normal mixed diet significantly reduces the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation. With a vegetarian diet a similar decline in urinary supersaturation with calcium oxalate can be achieved compared to a normal mixed diet. Since urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly, a vegetarian diet without adequate intake of calcium may not be recommended to patients with mild hyperoxaluria. SN - 0302-2838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12234515/The_effect_of_different_diets_on_urine_composition_and_the_risk_of_calcium_oxalate_crystallisation_in_healthy_subjects_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0302283802003160 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -