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Inhibition of improgan antinociception by the cannabinoid (CB)(1) antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A): lack of obligatory role for endocannabinoids acting at CB(1) receptors.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2002 Oct; 303(1):314-22.JP

Abstract

Improgan, a nonopioid antinociceptive agent, activates descending, pain-relieving mechanisms in the brain stem, but the receptor for this compound has not been identified. Because cannabinoids also activate nonopioid analgesia by a brain stem action, experiments were performed to assess the significance of cannabinoid mechanisms in improgan antinociception. The cannabinoid CB(1) antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chloro phenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A) induced dose-dependent inhibition of improgan antinociception on the tail-flick test after i.c.v. administration in rats. The same treatments yielded comparable inhibition of cannabinoid [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-mor pholinyl)methyl]pyrol[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl)methanone monomethanesulfonate, WIN 55,212-2] analgesia. Inhibition of improgan and WIN 55,212-2 antinociception by SR141716A was also observed in Swiss-Webster mice. Radioligand binding studies showed no appreciable affinity of improgan on rat brain, mouse brain, and human recombinant CB(1) receptors, ruling out a direct action at these sites. To test the hypothesis that CB(1) receptors indirectly participate in improgan signaling, the effects of improgan were assessed in mice with a null mutation of the CB(1) gene with and without SR141716A pretreatment. Surprisingly, improgan induced complete antinociception in both CB(1) (-/-) and wild-type control [CB(1) (+/+)] mice. Furthermore, SR141716A inhibited improgan antinociception in CB(1) (+/+) mice, but not in CB(1) (-/-) mice. Taken together, the results show that SR141716A reduces improgan antinociception, but neither cannabinoids nor CB(1) receptors seem to play an obligatory role in improgan signaling. Present and previous studies suggest that Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol may act at both CB(1) and other receptors to relieve pain, but no evidence was found indicating that improgan uses either of these mechanisms. SR141716A will facilitate the study of improgan-like analgesics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, New York 12208, USA. houghl@mail.amc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12235266

Citation

Hough, L B., et al. "Inhibition of Improgan Antinociception By the Cannabinoid (CB)(1) Antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A): Lack of Obligatory Role for Endocannabinoids Acting at CB(1) Receptors." The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol. 303, no. 1, 2002, pp. 314-22.
Hough LB, Nalwalk JW, Stadel R, et al. Inhibition of improgan antinociception by the cannabinoid (CB)(1) antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A): lack of obligatory role for endocannabinoids acting at CB(1) receptors. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2002;303(1):314-22.
Hough, L. B., Nalwalk, J. W., Stadel, R., Timmerman, H., Leurs, R., Paria, B. C., Wang, X., & Dey, S. K. (2002). Inhibition of improgan antinociception by the cannabinoid (CB)(1) antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A): lack of obligatory role for endocannabinoids acting at CB(1) receptors. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 303(1), 314-22.
Hough LB, et al. Inhibition of Improgan Antinociception By the Cannabinoid (CB)(1) Antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A): Lack of Obligatory Role for Endocannabinoids Acting at CB(1) Receptors. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2002;303(1):314-22. PubMed PMID: 12235266.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inhibition of improgan antinociception by the cannabinoid (CB)(1) antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A): lack of obligatory role for endocannabinoids acting at CB(1) receptors. AU - Hough,L B, AU - Nalwalk,J W, AU - Stadel,R, AU - Timmerman,H, AU - Leurs,R, AU - Paria,B C, AU - Wang,X, AU - Dey,S K, PY - 2002/9/18/pubmed PY - 2002/10/22/medline PY - 2002/9/18/entrez SP - 314 EP - 22 JF - The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics JO - J Pharmacol Exp Ther VL - 303 IS - 1 N2 - Improgan, a nonopioid antinociceptive agent, activates descending, pain-relieving mechanisms in the brain stem, but the receptor for this compound has not been identified. Because cannabinoids also activate nonopioid analgesia by a brain stem action, experiments were performed to assess the significance of cannabinoid mechanisms in improgan antinociception. The cannabinoid CB(1) antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chloro phenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A) induced dose-dependent inhibition of improgan antinociception on the tail-flick test after i.c.v. administration in rats. The same treatments yielded comparable inhibition of cannabinoid [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-mor pholinyl)methyl]pyrol[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl)methanone monomethanesulfonate, WIN 55,212-2] analgesia. Inhibition of improgan and WIN 55,212-2 antinociception by SR141716A was also observed in Swiss-Webster mice. Radioligand binding studies showed no appreciable affinity of improgan on rat brain, mouse brain, and human recombinant CB(1) receptors, ruling out a direct action at these sites. To test the hypothesis that CB(1) receptors indirectly participate in improgan signaling, the effects of improgan were assessed in mice with a null mutation of the CB(1) gene with and without SR141716A pretreatment. Surprisingly, improgan induced complete antinociception in both CB(1) (-/-) and wild-type control [CB(1) (+/+)] mice. Furthermore, SR141716A inhibited improgan antinociception in CB(1) (+/+) mice, but not in CB(1) (-/-) mice. Taken together, the results show that SR141716A reduces improgan antinociception, but neither cannabinoids nor CB(1) receptors seem to play an obligatory role in improgan signaling. Present and previous studies suggest that Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol may act at both CB(1) and other receptors to relieve pain, but no evidence was found indicating that improgan uses either of these mechanisms. SR141716A will facilitate the study of improgan-like analgesics. SN - 0022-3565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12235266/Inhibition_of_improgan_antinociception_by_the_cannabinoid__CB__1__antagonist_N__piperidin_1_yl__5__4_chlorophenyl__1__24_dichlorophenyl__4_methyl_1H_pyrazole_3_carboxamide__SR141716A_:_lack_of_obligatory_role_for_endocannabinoids_acting_at_CB_1__receptors_ L2 - https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12235266 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -