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The relationship of changes in serum estradiol and progesterone during the menstrual cycle to the thyrotropin and prolactin responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1978; 47(6):1296-302JC

Abstract

The responses of serum TSH and PRL to TRH (500 microgram) were studied in normal young women in the early follicular, periovulatory, and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle in order to examine the relationship of these responses to the levels of estradiol relationship of these responses to the levels of estradiol (E2) and progesterone. Each woman was studied twice in each phase in order to assess intraindividual variability. There was no significant difference in either the TSH or PRL responses among the phases of the menstrual cycle nor was either response affected by the periovulatory rise in E2 or by the luteal rise in both E2 and progesterone. Thus, the interpretation of the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in normal women is not affected by the menstrual cycle although both responses are greater in women that in men. Both the peak TSH and peak PRL after TRH were highly correlated with the basal levels of TSH (r = 0.85; P less than 0.01) and PRL (r = 0.67; P less than 0.01), respectively, indicating that the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in women are directly proportionate to the basal levels of the respective hormones, as previously shown for the TSH response in men. The mean intraindividual variability (coefficient of variation) of the TSH response to TRH was 18%, but ranged as high as 56%, while that of the PRL response was 16% and ranged up to 31%; variability was not affected by the phase of the menstrual cycle. The normal range of the peak TSH after TRH in women is 7-33 microU/ml (mean +/- 2 SD); however, because of the variability, a normal woman may sometimes have a peak TSH after TRH as low as 4 microU/ml. Repeating the test will result in a normal value if the woman is truly normal. Similarly, the normal peak PRL after TRH in women is 22-111 ng/ml (mean +/- 2 SD); usually, however, the lower limit is 30 ng/ml with lower values due to intraindividual variation. The data suggest that the higher average level of E2 in women compared to women, but that the cyclic changes in serum E2 or progesterone in women have little or no additional effect.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

122427

Citation

Sawin, C T., et al. "The Relationship of Changes in Serum Estradiol and Progesterone During the Menstrual Cycle to the Thyrotropin and Prolactin Responses to Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 47, no. 6, 1978, pp. 1296-302.
Sawin CT, Hershman JM, Boyd AE, et al. The relationship of changes in serum estradiol and progesterone during the menstrual cycle to the thyrotropin and prolactin responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1978;47(6):1296-302.
Sawin, C. T., Hershman, J. M., Boyd, A. E., Longcope, C., & Bacharach, P. (1978). The relationship of changes in serum estradiol and progesterone during the menstrual cycle to the thyrotropin and prolactin responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 47(6), pp. 1296-302.
Sawin CT, et al. The Relationship of Changes in Serum Estradiol and Progesterone During the Menstrual Cycle to the Thyrotropin and Prolactin Responses to Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1978;47(6):1296-302. PubMed PMID: 122427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship of changes in serum estradiol and progesterone during the menstrual cycle to the thyrotropin and prolactin responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. AU - Sawin,C T, AU - Hershman,J M, AU - Boyd,A E,3rd AU - Longcope,C, AU - Bacharach,P, PY - 1978/12/1/pubmed PY - 1978/12/1/medline PY - 1978/12/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Biology KW - Clinical Research KW - Demographic Factors KW - Endocrine System KW - Estradiol--analysis KW - Estrogens KW - Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Hormones KW - Laboratory Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Laboratory Procedures KW - Menstrual Cycle KW - Menstruation KW - Physiology KW - Pituitary Hormone Releasing Hormones--analysis KW - Pituitary Hormones KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Progestational Hormones KW - Progesterone--analysis KW - Prolactin--analysis KW - Reproduction KW - Research Methodology KW - Women SP - 1296 EP - 302 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 47 IS - 6 N2 - The responses of serum TSH and PRL to TRH (500 microgram) were studied in normal young women in the early follicular, periovulatory, and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle in order to examine the relationship of these responses to the levels of estradiol relationship of these responses to the levels of estradiol (E2) and progesterone. Each woman was studied twice in each phase in order to assess intraindividual variability. There was no significant difference in either the TSH or PRL responses among the phases of the menstrual cycle nor was either response affected by the periovulatory rise in E2 or by the luteal rise in both E2 and progesterone. Thus, the interpretation of the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in normal women is not affected by the menstrual cycle although both responses are greater in women that in men. Both the peak TSH and peak PRL after TRH were highly correlated with the basal levels of TSH (r = 0.85; P less than 0.01) and PRL (r = 0.67; P less than 0.01), respectively, indicating that the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in women are directly proportionate to the basal levels of the respective hormones, as previously shown for the TSH response in men. The mean intraindividual variability (coefficient of variation) of the TSH response to TRH was 18%, but ranged as high as 56%, while that of the PRL response was 16% and ranged up to 31%; variability was not affected by the phase of the menstrual cycle. The normal range of the peak TSH after TRH in women is 7-33 microU/ml (mean +/- 2 SD); however, because of the variability, a normal woman may sometimes have a peak TSH after TRH as low as 4 microU/ml. Repeating the test will result in a normal value if the woman is truly normal. Similarly, the normal peak PRL after TRH in women is 22-111 ng/ml (mean +/- 2 SD); usually, however, the lower limit is 30 ng/ml with lower values due to intraindividual variation. The data suggest that the higher average level of E2 in women compared to women, but that the cyclic changes in serum E2 or progesterone in women have little or no additional effect. SN - 0021-972X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/122427/The_relationship_of_changes_in_serum_estradiol_and_progesterone_during_the_menstrual_cycle_to_the_thyrotropin_and_prolactin_responses_to_thyrotropin_releasing_hormone_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jcem-47-6-1296 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -