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Carpal tunnel syndrome in repetitive work: a follow-up study.
Am J Ind Med. 2002 Oct; 42(4):344-53.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Project on Research and Intervention in Monotonous work (PRIM) studied Danish workers for 3-4 years to determine the effects of monotonous work. The present study is a subset of that cohort and compares prevalence and incidence differences of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) between workers with highly repetitive work tasks and workers with varied work tasks.

METHODS

The baseline study included 731 participants. Follow-up examinations were performed after 6 and 18 months. The CTS diagnosis was based on symptom interviews and nerve conduction tests. The repetitiveness levels were determined with electrogoniometers and observation of cycle times.

RESULTS

The overall prevalence of CTS was 1.6% on the working hand and 0.7% on the other hand. There was a significantly increased risk of CTS for every 10-hr increase of repetitive non-forceful work (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.06-3.19) on the working hand. This result, however, was based on few cases and a low prevalence in the control group. The overall annual CTS incidence was 0.62% on the working hand and 0.44% on the other hand. For the repetitive work tasks, the mean power frequencies ranged from 0.53 to 0.79 Hz.

CONCLUSIONS

In the baseline study, highly repetitive work was associated with CTS. The CTS incidence was too low to perform any analyses of exposure differences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark. jfth@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12271482

Citation

Thomsen, Jane Frølund, et al. "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Repetitive Work: a Follow-up Study." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 42, no. 4, 2002, pp. 344-53.
Thomsen JF, Hansson GA, Mikkelsen S, et al. Carpal tunnel syndrome in repetitive work: a follow-up study. Am J Ind Med. 2002;42(4):344-53.
Thomsen, J. F., Hansson, G. A., Mikkelsen, S., & Lauritzen, M. (2002). Carpal tunnel syndrome in repetitive work: a follow-up study. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 42(4), 344-53.
Thomsen JF, et al. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Repetitive Work: a Follow-up Study. Am J Ind Med. 2002;42(4):344-53. PubMed PMID: 12271482.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carpal tunnel syndrome in repetitive work: a follow-up study. AU - Thomsen,Jane Frølund, AU - Hansson,Gert-Ake, AU - Mikkelsen,Sigurd, AU - Lauritzen,Martin, PY - 2002/9/25/pubmed PY - 2002/12/21/medline PY - 2002/9/25/entrez SP - 344 EP - 53 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am J Ind Med VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Project on Research and Intervention in Monotonous work (PRIM) studied Danish workers for 3-4 years to determine the effects of monotonous work. The present study is a subset of that cohort and compares prevalence and incidence differences of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) between workers with highly repetitive work tasks and workers with varied work tasks. METHODS: The baseline study included 731 participants. Follow-up examinations were performed after 6 and 18 months. The CTS diagnosis was based on symptom interviews and nerve conduction tests. The repetitiveness levels were determined with electrogoniometers and observation of cycle times. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of CTS was 1.6% on the working hand and 0.7% on the other hand. There was a significantly increased risk of CTS for every 10-hr increase of repetitive non-forceful work (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.06-3.19) on the working hand. This result, however, was based on few cases and a low prevalence in the control group. The overall annual CTS incidence was 0.62% on the working hand and 0.44% on the other hand. For the repetitive work tasks, the mean power frequencies ranged from 0.53 to 0.79 Hz. CONCLUSIONS: In the baseline study, highly repetitive work was associated with CTS. The CTS incidence was too low to perform any analyses of exposure differences. SN - 0271-3586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12271482/Carpal_tunnel_syndrome_in_repetitive_work:_a_follow_up_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -