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Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs.
Res Rep Health Eff Inst 2002; (109):1-40; discussion 41-51RR

Abstract

Although acute exposure to ozone (03*) has been shown to influence the severity and prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, information has been lacking on effects due to long-term exposure at relatively low exposure concentrations. The goals of this study were to determine whether long-term repeated ozone exposures could induce nonspecific hyperresponsiveness in normal, nonatopic (nonsensitized) animals, whether such exposure could exacerbate the preexisting hyperresponsive state in atopic (sensitized) animals, or both. The study was also designed to determine whether gender modulated airway responsiveness related to ozone exposure. Airway responsiveness was measured during and after exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 ppm ozone for 4 hours/day, 4 days/week for 24 weeks in normal, nonsensitized guinea pigs, in guinea pigs sensitized to an allergen (ovalbumin) prior to initiation of ozone exposures, and in animals sensitized concurrently with ozone exposures. Both male and female animals were studied. Ozone exposure did not produce airway hyperresponsiveness in nonsensitized animals. Ozone exposure did exacerbate airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific bronchoprovocation in both groups of sensitized animals, and this effect persisted at least 4 weeks after the end of the exposures. Although the overall degree of airway responsiveness did differ between genders (males had more responsive airways than did females), the airway response to ozone exposure did not differ between the two groups. Ozone-induced effects upon airway responsiveness were not associated with the number of pulmonary eosinophils or with any chronic pulmonary inflammatory response. Levels of antigen-specific antibodies increased in sensitized animals, and a significant correlation was observed between airway responsiveness and antibody levels. The results of this study provide support for a role of ambient ozone exposure in exacerbation of airway dysfunction in persons with atopy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Tuxedo, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12322853

Citation

Schlesinger, Richard B., et al. "Ozone-induced Modulation of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Guinea Pigs." Research Report (Health Effects Institute), 2002, pp. 1-40; discussion 41-51.
Schlesinger RB, Cohen M, Gordon T, et al. Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. Res Rep Health Eff Inst. 2002.
Schlesinger, R. B., Cohen, M., Gordon, T., Nadziejko, C., Zelikoff, J. T., Sisco, M., ... Ménache, M. G. (2002). Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. Research Report (Health Effects Institute), (109), pp. 1-40; discussion 41-51.
Schlesinger RB, et al. Ozone-induced Modulation of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Guinea Pigs. Res Rep Health Eff Inst. 2002;(109)1-40; discussion 41-51. PubMed PMID: 12322853.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. AU - Schlesinger,Richard B, AU - Cohen,Mitchell, AU - Gordon,Terry, AU - Nadziejko,Christine, AU - Zelikoff,Judith T, AU - Sisco,Maureen, AU - Regal,Jean F, AU - Ménache,Margaret G, PY - 2002/9/27/pubmed PY - 2003/1/24/medline PY - 2002/9/27/entrez SP - 1-40; discussion 41-51 JF - Research report (Health Effects Institute) JO - Res Rep Health Eff Inst IS - 109 N2 - Although acute exposure to ozone (03*) has been shown to influence the severity and prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, information has been lacking on effects due to long-term exposure at relatively low exposure concentrations. The goals of this study were to determine whether long-term repeated ozone exposures could induce nonspecific hyperresponsiveness in normal, nonatopic (nonsensitized) animals, whether such exposure could exacerbate the preexisting hyperresponsive state in atopic (sensitized) animals, or both. The study was also designed to determine whether gender modulated airway responsiveness related to ozone exposure. Airway responsiveness was measured during and after exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 ppm ozone for 4 hours/day, 4 days/week for 24 weeks in normal, nonsensitized guinea pigs, in guinea pigs sensitized to an allergen (ovalbumin) prior to initiation of ozone exposures, and in animals sensitized concurrently with ozone exposures. Both male and female animals were studied. Ozone exposure did not produce airway hyperresponsiveness in nonsensitized animals. Ozone exposure did exacerbate airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific bronchoprovocation in both groups of sensitized animals, and this effect persisted at least 4 weeks after the end of the exposures. Although the overall degree of airway responsiveness did differ between genders (males had more responsive airways than did females), the airway response to ozone exposure did not differ between the two groups. Ozone-induced effects upon airway responsiveness were not associated with the number of pulmonary eosinophils or with any chronic pulmonary inflammatory response. Levels of antigen-specific antibodies increased in sensitized animals, and a significant correlation was observed between airway responsiveness and antibody levels. The results of this study provide support for a role of ambient ozone exposure in exacerbation of airway dysfunction in persons with atopy. SN - 1041-5505 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12322853/Ozone_induced_modulation_of_airway_hyperresponsiveness_in_guinea_pigs_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/ozone.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -