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Serum carotenoid concentrations in US children and adolescents.
Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76(4):818-27AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Carotenoids, a class of phytochemicals, may affect the risk of several chronic conditions.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to describe the distributions and correlates of serum carotenoid concentrations in US children and adolescents.

DESIGN

Using data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), a cross-sectional study, we examined the distributions of serum concentrations of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin, and lycopene among 4231 persons aged 6-16 y.

RESULTS

After adjustment for age, sex, race or ethnicity, poverty-income ratio, body mass index status, HDL- and non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations, C-reactive protein concentration, and cotinine concentration, only HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.001) and non-HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.001) concentrations were directly related to all carotenoid concentrations. Age (P < 0.001) and body mass index status (P < 0.001) were inversely related to all carotenoid concentrations except those of lycopene. Young males had slightly higher carotenoid concentrations than did young females, but the differences were significant only for lycopene concentrations (P = 0.029). African American children and adolescents had significantly higher beta-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.001), lutein and zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and lycopene (P = 0.006) concentrations but lower alpha-carotene (P < 0.001) concentrations than did white children and adolescents. Mexican American children and adolescents had higher alpha-carotene (P < 0.001), beta-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.001), and lutein and zeaxanthin (P < 0.001) concentrations but lower lycopene (P = 0.001) concentrations than did white children and adolescents. C-reactive protein concentrations were inversely related to beta-carotene (P < 0.001), lutein and zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and lycopene (P = 0.023) concentrations. Cotinine concentrations were inversely related to alpha-carotene (P = 0.002), beta-carotene (P < 0.001), and beta-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.001) concentrations.

CONCLUSION

These data show significant variations in serum carotenoid concentrations among US children and adolescents and may be valuable as reference ranges for this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. esf2@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12324296

Citation

Ford, Earl S., et al. "Serum Carotenoid Concentrations in US Children and Adolescents." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 76, no. 4, 2002, pp. 818-27.
Ford ES, Gillespie C, Ballew C, et al. Serum carotenoid concentrations in US children and adolescents. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;76(4):818-27.
Ford, E. S., Gillespie, C., Ballew, C., Sowell, A., & Mannino, D. M. (2002). Serum carotenoid concentrations in US children and adolescents. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 76(4), pp. 818-27.
Ford ES, et al. Serum Carotenoid Concentrations in US Children and Adolescents. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;76(4):818-27. PubMed PMID: 12324296.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum carotenoid concentrations in US children and adolescents. AU - Ford,Earl S, AU - Gillespie,Cathleen, AU - Ballew,Carol, AU - Sowell,Anne, AU - Mannino,David M, PY - 2002/9/27/pubmed PY - 2002/10/12/medline PY - 2002/9/27/entrez SP - 818 EP - 27 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 76 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Carotenoids, a class of phytochemicals, may affect the risk of several chronic conditions. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to describe the distributions and correlates of serum carotenoid concentrations in US children and adolescents. DESIGN: Using data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), a cross-sectional study, we examined the distributions of serum concentrations of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin, and lycopene among 4231 persons aged 6-16 y. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, race or ethnicity, poverty-income ratio, body mass index status, HDL- and non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations, C-reactive protein concentration, and cotinine concentration, only HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.001) and non-HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.001) concentrations were directly related to all carotenoid concentrations. Age (P < 0.001) and body mass index status (P < 0.001) were inversely related to all carotenoid concentrations except those of lycopene. Young males had slightly higher carotenoid concentrations than did young females, but the differences were significant only for lycopene concentrations (P = 0.029). African American children and adolescents had significantly higher beta-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.001), lutein and zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and lycopene (P = 0.006) concentrations but lower alpha-carotene (P < 0.001) concentrations than did white children and adolescents. Mexican American children and adolescents had higher alpha-carotene (P < 0.001), beta-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.001), and lutein and zeaxanthin (P < 0.001) concentrations but lower lycopene (P = 0.001) concentrations than did white children and adolescents. C-reactive protein concentrations were inversely related to beta-carotene (P < 0.001), lutein and zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and lycopene (P = 0.023) concentrations. Cotinine concentrations were inversely related to alpha-carotene (P = 0.002), beta-carotene (P < 0.001), and beta-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.001) concentrations. CONCLUSION: These data show significant variations in serum carotenoid concentrations among US children and adolescents and may be valuable as reference ranges for this population. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12324296/Serum_carotenoid_concentrations_in_US_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/76.4.818 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -