Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of a 1 year combined aerobic- and weight-training exercise programme on aerobic capacity and ventilatory threshold in patients suffering from coronary artery disease.
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2002 Oct; 87(6):568-75.EJ

Abstract

Weight-training is recommended as a complement to conventional aerobic-training for most low to moderate risk patients suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 1 year exercise programme combining weight- and aerobic-training on peak oxygen uptake (V*O2,peak) and ventilatory threshold (VT). We studied 40 men suffering CAD who were divided into three groups: 14 subjects to weight-training plus aerobic-training [mean (SD] [combined exercise group, age 55 (10) years], 14 to aerobic-training only [aerobic-training group, age 57 (11) years], and 12 to a control group [standard care, age 57 (11) years]. A symptom-limited graded exercise test using the standard Bruce protocol was performed using a 12-lead electrocardiogram, and gas analysis techniques. Muscle strength was determined only in the combined exercise group using the one-repetition maximum method on each of eight weight exercises. Arm and leg strength increased by 21.9% and 27.8% respectively (P<0.0001) from pre to post-tests. The V*O2,peak did not differ between the combined and aerobic-training groups but their adjusted means were greater than those of the control group [39 (1.8) and 35.3 (1.8) compared to 26.2 (2.7) ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (P<0.001)]. The oxygen uptake at VT was higher in the combined group [24.7 (1.4) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] compared to aerobic [18.7 (1.4) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] and control [13.6 (1.7) ml.kg(-1)min(-1)] groups (P<0.001). Similar results were found for exercise tolerance (treadmill time to peak and at VT). Combined exercise training increased the VT more than aerobic-training alone. Combined exercise training did not improve the V*O2,peak or the functional capacity more than aerobic-training alone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise and Health Department, Faculty of Human Movement, Technical University of Lisbon, Estrada da Costa 1495-688 Cruz-Quebrada, Lisbon, Portugal. santaclara@fmh.utl.ptNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12355198

Citation

Santa-Clara, Helena, et al. "Effect of a 1 Year Combined Aerobic- and Weight-training Exercise Programme On Aerobic Capacity and Ventilatory Threshold in Patients Suffering From Coronary Artery Disease." European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 87, no. 6, 2002, pp. 568-75.
Santa-Clara H, Fernhall B, Mendes M, et al. Effect of a 1 year combined aerobic- and weight-training exercise programme on aerobic capacity and ventilatory threshold in patients suffering from coronary artery disease. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2002;87(6):568-75.
Santa-Clara, H., Fernhall, B., Mendes, M., & Sardinha, L. B. (2002). Effect of a 1 year combined aerobic- and weight-training exercise programme on aerobic capacity and ventilatory threshold in patients suffering from coronary artery disease. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 87(6), 568-75.
Santa-Clara H, et al. Effect of a 1 Year Combined Aerobic- and Weight-training Exercise Programme On Aerobic Capacity and Ventilatory Threshold in Patients Suffering From Coronary Artery Disease. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2002;87(6):568-75. PubMed PMID: 12355198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of a 1 year combined aerobic- and weight-training exercise programme on aerobic capacity and ventilatory threshold in patients suffering from coronary artery disease. AU - Santa-Clara,Helena, AU - Fernhall,Bo, AU - Mendes,Miguel, AU - Sardinha,Luís Bettencourt, Y1 - 2002/07/30/ PY - 2002/06/12/accepted PY - 2002/10/2/pubmed PY - 2004/4/13/medline PY - 2002/10/2/entrez SP - 568 EP - 75 JF - European journal of applied physiology JO - Eur J Appl Physiol VL - 87 IS - 6 N2 - Weight-training is recommended as a complement to conventional aerobic-training for most low to moderate risk patients suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 1 year exercise programme combining weight- and aerobic-training on peak oxygen uptake (V*O2,peak) and ventilatory threshold (VT). We studied 40 men suffering CAD who were divided into three groups: 14 subjects to weight-training plus aerobic-training [mean (SD] [combined exercise group, age 55 (10) years], 14 to aerobic-training only [aerobic-training group, age 57 (11) years], and 12 to a control group [standard care, age 57 (11) years]. A symptom-limited graded exercise test using the standard Bruce protocol was performed using a 12-lead electrocardiogram, and gas analysis techniques. Muscle strength was determined only in the combined exercise group using the one-repetition maximum method on each of eight weight exercises. Arm and leg strength increased by 21.9% and 27.8% respectively (P<0.0001) from pre to post-tests. The V*O2,peak did not differ between the combined and aerobic-training groups but their adjusted means were greater than those of the control group [39 (1.8) and 35.3 (1.8) compared to 26.2 (2.7) ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (P<0.001)]. The oxygen uptake at VT was higher in the combined group [24.7 (1.4) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] compared to aerobic [18.7 (1.4) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] and control [13.6 (1.7) ml.kg(-1)min(-1)] groups (P<0.001). Similar results were found for exercise tolerance (treadmill time to peak and at VT). Combined exercise training increased the VT more than aerobic-training alone. Combined exercise training did not improve the V*O2,peak or the functional capacity more than aerobic-training alone. SN - 1439-6319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12355198/Effect_of_a_1_year_combined_aerobic__and_weight_training_exercise_programme_on_aerobic_capacity_and_ventilatory_threshold_in_patients_suffering_from_coronary_artery_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -