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Deaths: leading causes for 2000.
Natl Vital Stat Rep 2002; 50(16):1-85NV

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This report presents final 2000 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, race, sex, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the annual report of final mortality statistics.

METHODS

Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 States and the District of Columbia in 2000. Causes of death classified by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes.

RESULTS

In 2000 the 10 leading causes of death were (in rank order) Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Cerebrovascular diseases; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Alzheimer's disease; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Septicemia and accounted for nearly 80 percent of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evidently by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2000 were (in rank order) Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birthweight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Respiratory distress of newborn; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Intrauterine hypoxia and birth asphyxia. Important variation in the leading causes of infant death is noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12355905

Citation

Anderson, Robert N.. "Deaths: Leading Causes for 2000." National Vital Statistics Reports : From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, vol. 50, no. 16, 2002, pp. 1-85.
Anderson RN. Deaths: leading causes for 2000. Natl Vital Stat Rep. 2002;50(16):1-85.
Anderson, R. N. (2002). Deaths: leading causes for 2000. National Vital Statistics Reports : From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, 50(16), pp. 1-85.
Anderson RN. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2000. Natl Vital Stat Rep. 2002 Sep 16;50(16):1-85. PubMed PMID: 12355905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Deaths: leading causes for 2000. A1 - Anderson,Robert N, PY - 2002/10/3/pubmed PY - 2002/10/31/medline PY - 2002/10/3/entrez SP - 1 EP - 85 JF - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System JO - Natl Vital Stat Rep VL - 50 IS - 16 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This report presents final 2000 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, race, sex, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the annual report of final mortality statistics. METHODS: Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 States and the District of Columbia in 2000. Causes of death classified by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. RESULTS: In 2000 the 10 leading causes of death were (in rank order) Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Cerebrovascular diseases; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Alzheimer's disease; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Septicemia and accounted for nearly 80 percent of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evidently by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2000 were (in rank order) Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birthweight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Respiratory distress of newborn; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Intrauterine hypoxia and birth asphyxia. Important variation in the leading causes of infant death is noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. SN - 1551-8922 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12355905/Deaths:_leading_causes_for_2000_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr50/nvsr50_16.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -