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Total antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables and risk of gastric cancer.
Gastroenterology 2002; 123(4):985-91G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Dietary antioxidants, with additive and synergistic effects, can mediate the observed inverse association between plant food intake and risk of gastric cancer. We investigated whether the total dietary antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables is an appropriate means of estimating the antioxidant impact on gastric cancer risk in a large population-based study.

METHODS

With a population-based case-control design, data were collected through face-to-face interviews with 505 newly diagnosed gastric adenocarcinoma patients and 1116 control subjects to assess dietary habits 20 years before interview. The total radical-trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP) of different plant foods was used to convert food frequency intake into antioxidant potential. Gastric cancer risk in groups exposed to higher levels of oxidative stress (smoking and Helicobacter pylori infection) was also examined.

RESULTS

Intake of antioxidant equivalents was inversely associated with the risk of both cardia and distal gastric cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.89 for the highest quartile of TRAP). Controlling for smoking, the inverse relationship between TRAP values displayed a clearer dose-response pattern. Never-smokers with the highest antioxidant intake had the lowest risk of cancer, 0.44 (95% CI, 0.27-0.71). Among H. pylori-infected subjects, the ORs varied between 0.66 and 0.41 for increasing levels of antioxidant potential.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that dietary intake of antioxidants measured as total antioxidant potential is inversely associated with risk of both cardia and distal cancer. The innovative approach used in this study provides a new tool for investigating the relationship between dietary antioxidants and oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Antioxidant Research Laboratory, Unit of Human Nutrition, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca per gli Alimenti e la Nutrizione (INRAN), Rome, Italy. serafini@inran.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12360458

Citation

Serafini, Mauro, et al. "Total Antioxidant Potential of Fruit and Vegetables and Risk of Gastric Cancer." Gastroenterology, vol. 123, no. 4, 2002, pp. 985-91.
Serafini M, Bellocco R, Wolk A, et al. Total antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables and risk of gastric cancer. Gastroenterology. 2002;123(4):985-91.
Serafini, M., Bellocco, R., Wolk, A., & Ekström, A. M. (2002). Total antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables and risk of gastric cancer. Gastroenterology, 123(4), pp. 985-91.
Serafini M, et al. Total Antioxidant Potential of Fruit and Vegetables and Risk of Gastric Cancer. Gastroenterology. 2002;123(4):985-91. PubMed PMID: 12360458.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables and risk of gastric cancer. AU - Serafini,Mauro, AU - Bellocco,Rino, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Ekström,Anna Mia, PY - 2002/10/3/pubmed PY - 2002/10/31/medline PY - 2002/10/3/entrez SP - 985 EP - 91 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 123 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Dietary antioxidants, with additive and synergistic effects, can mediate the observed inverse association between plant food intake and risk of gastric cancer. We investigated whether the total dietary antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables is an appropriate means of estimating the antioxidant impact on gastric cancer risk in a large population-based study. METHODS: With a population-based case-control design, data were collected through face-to-face interviews with 505 newly diagnosed gastric adenocarcinoma patients and 1116 control subjects to assess dietary habits 20 years before interview. The total radical-trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP) of different plant foods was used to convert food frequency intake into antioxidant potential. Gastric cancer risk in groups exposed to higher levels of oxidative stress (smoking and Helicobacter pylori infection) was also examined. RESULTS: Intake of antioxidant equivalents was inversely associated with the risk of both cardia and distal gastric cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.89 for the highest quartile of TRAP). Controlling for smoking, the inverse relationship between TRAP values displayed a clearer dose-response pattern. Never-smokers with the highest antioxidant intake had the lowest risk of cancer, 0.44 (95% CI, 0.27-0.71). Among H. pylori-infected subjects, the ORs varied between 0.66 and 0.41 for increasing levels of antioxidant potential. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that dietary intake of antioxidants measured as total antioxidant potential is inversely associated with risk of both cardia and distal cancer. The innovative approach used in this study provides a new tool for investigating the relationship between dietary antioxidants and oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12360458/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016508502002019 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -