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Body mass index, waist circumference, and health risk: evidence in support of current National Institutes of Health guidelines.
Arch Intern Med 2002; 162(18):2074-9AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

No evidence supports the waist circumference (WC) cutoff points recommended by the National Institutes of Health to identify subjects at increased health risk within the various body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) categories.

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether the prevalence of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome is greater in individuals with high compared with normal WC values within the same BMI category.

METHODS

The subjects consisted of 14 924 adult participants of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Subjects were grouped by BMI and WC in accordance with the National Institutes of Health cutoff points. Within the normal-weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and class I obese (30.0-34.9) BMI categories, we computed odds ratios for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome and compared subjects in the high-risk (men, >102 cm; women, >88 cm) and normal-risk (men, <or=102 cm; women, <or=88 cm) WC categories.

RESULTS

With few exceptions, within the 3 BMI categories, those with high WC values were increasingly likely to have hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome compared with those with normal WC values. Many of these associations remained significant after adjusting for the confounding variables (age, race, poverty-income ratio, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake) in normal-weight, overweight, and class I obese women and overweight men.

CONCLUSIONS

The National Institutes of Health cutoff points for WC help to identify those at increased health risk within the normal-weight, overweight, and class I obese BMI categories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Physical and Health Education, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12374515

Citation

Janssen, Ian, et al. "Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, and Health Risk: Evidence in Support of Current National Institutes of Health Guidelines." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 162, no. 18, 2002, pp. 2074-9.
Janssen I, Katzmarzyk PT, Ross R. Body mass index, waist circumference, and health risk: evidence in support of current National Institutes of Health guidelines. Arch Intern Med. 2002;162(18):2074-9.
Janssen, I., Katzmarzyk, P. T., & Ross, R. (2002). Body mass index, waist circumference, and health risk: evidence in support of current National Institutes of Health guidelines. Archives of Internal Medicine, 162(18), pp. 2074-9.
Janssen I, Katzmarzyk PT, Ross R. Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, and Health Risk: Evidence in Support of Current National Institutes of Health Guidelines. Arch Intern Med. 2002 Oct 14;162(18):2074-9. PubMed PMID: 12374515.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index, waist circumference, and health risk: evidence in support of current National Institutes of Health guidelines. AU - Janssen,Ian, AU - Katzmarzyk,Peter T, AU - Ross,Robert, PY - 2002/10/11/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/10/11/entrez SP - 2074 EP - 9 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 162 IS - 18 N2 - BACKGROUND: No evidence supports the waist circumference (WC) cutoff points recommended by the National Institutes of Health to identify subjects at increased health risk within the various body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) categories. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the prevalence of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome is greater in individuals with high compared with normal WC values within the same BMI category. METHODS: The subjects consisted of 14 924 adult participants of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Subjects were grouped by BMI and WC in accordance with the National Institutes of Health cutoff points. Within the normal-weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and class I obese (30.0-34.9) BMI categories, we computed odds ratios for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome and compared subjects in the high-risk (men, >102 cm; women, >88 cm) and normal-risk (men, <or=102 cm; women, <or=88 cm) WC categories. RESULTS: With few exceptions, within the 3 BMI categories, those with high WC values were increasingly likely to have hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome compared with those with normal WC values. Many of these associations remained significant after adjusting for the confounding variables (age, race, poverty-income ratio, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake) in normal-weight, overweight, and class I obese women and overweight men. CONCLUSIONS: The National Institutes of Health cutoff points for WC help to identify those at increased health risk within the normal-weight, overweight, and class I obese BMI categories. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12374515/Body_mass_index_waist_circumference_and_health_risk:_evidence_in_support_of_current_National_Institutes_of_Health_guidelines_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/162/pg/2074 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -