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Prevention of complicated ulcer disease among chronic users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: the use of a nomogram in cost-effectiveness analysis.
Arch Intern Med. 2002 Oct 14; 162(18):2105-10.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with an increased risk of clinical upper gastrointestinal tract (UGI) events, namely, symptomatic ulcer, perforation, bleeding, and obstruction. Our objective in this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of several strategies aimed at reducing the risk of clinical UGI events in NSAID users.

METHODS

A decision tree model was used for patients requiring long-term treatment with NSAIDs to compare conventional NSAID therapy alone with 7 other treatment strategies to reduce the risk of NSAID-related clinical UGI events (cotherapy with proton-pump inhibitor, cotherapy with misoprostol, cyclooxygenase [COX]-2-selective NSAID therapy, or Helicobacter pylori treatment followed by each of the previous strategies, including conventional NSAID treatment, respectively). The outcome measure is the incremental cost per clinical UGI event prevented compared with conventional NSAID treatment over 1 year.

RESULTS

The use of a COX-2-selective NSAID and cotherapy with proton-pump inhibitors were the 2 most cost-effective strategies. However, the incremental cost associated with these strategies was high (>$35 000) in persons with a low risk of clinical UGI event with conventional NSAIDs (eg, 2.5% per year). If the baseline risk of clinical UGI events is moderately high (eg, 6.5%), using a COX-2-selective NSAID becomes the most effective and least costly (dominant) treatment strategy, followed closely by cotherapy with a daily proton-pump inhibitor. Because small changes in costs or assumed efficacy of these drugs could change the conclusions, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between any 2 strategies were presented in a nomogram that allows the flexible use of a wide range of values for costs and rates of clinical UGI events.

CONCLUSIONS

The risk of clinical UGI events in NSAID users depends on their baseline risk, the added risk associated with the individual NSAID, and the protection conferred by cotherapy. A nomogram can be used to incorporate these factors and derive estimates regarding cost-effectiveness of competing strategies aimed at reducing the risk of clinical UGI events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Services Research Sections, Houston Center for Quality of Care & Utilization Studies, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. hasheme@bcm.tmc.edu ,No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12374519

Citation

El-Serag, Hashem B., et al. "Prevention of Complicated Ulcer Disease Among Chronic Users of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs: the Use of a Nomogram in Cost-effectiveness Analysis." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 162, no. 18, 2002, pp. 2105-10.
El-Serag HB, Graham DY, Richardson P, et al. Prevention of complicated ulcer disease among chronic users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: the use of a nomogram in cost-effectiveness analysis. Arch Intern Med. 2002;162(18):2105-10.
El-Serag, H. B., Graham, D. Y., Richardson, P., & Inadomi, J. M. (2002). Prevention of complicated ulcer disease among chronic users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: the use of a nomogram in cost-effectiveness analysis. Archives of Internal Medicine, 162(18), 2105-10.
El-Serag HB, et al. Prevention of Complicated Ulcer Disease Among Chronic Users of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs: the Use of a Nomogram in Cost-effectiveness Analysis. Arch Intern Med. 2002 Oct 14;162(18):2105-10. PubMed PMID: 12374519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevention of complicated ulcer disease among chronic users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: the use of a nomogram in cost-effectiveness analysis. AU - El-Serag,Hashem B, AU - Graham,David Y, AU - Richardson,Peter, AU - Inadomi,John M, PY - 2002/10/11/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/10/11/entrez SP - 2105 EP - 10 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 162 IS - 18 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with an increased risk of clinical upper gastrointestinal tract (UGI) events, namely, symptomatic ulcer, perforation, bleeding, and obstruction. Our objective in this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of several strategies aimed at reducing the risk of clinical UGI events in NSAID users. METHODS: A decision tree model was used for patients requiring long-term treatment with NSAIDs to compare conventional NSAID therapy alone with 7 other treatment strategies to reduce the risk of NSAID-related clinical UGI events (cotherapy with proton-pump inhibitor, cotherapy with misoprostol, cyclooxygenase [COX]-2-selective NSAID therapy, or Helicobacter pylori treatment followed by each of the previous strategies, including conventional NSAID treatment, respectively). The outcome measure is the incremental cost per clinical UGI event prevented compared with conventional NSAID treatment over 1 year. RESULTS: The use of a COX-2-selective NSAID and cotherapy with proton-pump inhibitors were the 2 most cost-effective strategies. However, the incremental cost associated with these strategies was high (>$35 000) in persons with a low risk of clinical UGI event with conventional NSAIDs (eg, 2.5% per year). If the baseline risk of clinical UGI events is moderately high (eg, 6.5%), using a COX-2-selective NSAID becomes the most effective and least costly (dominant) treatment strategy, followed closely by cotherapy with a daily proton-pump inhibitor. Because small changes in costs or assumed efficacy of these drugs could change the conclusions, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between any 2 strategies were presented in a nomogram that allows the flexible use of a wide range of values for costs and rates of clinical UGI events. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of clinical UGI events in NSAID users depends on their baseline risk, the added risk associated with the individual NSAID, and the protection conferred by cotherapy. A nomogram can be used to incorporate these factors and derive estimates regarding cost-effectiveness of competing strategies aimed at reducing the risk of clinical UGI events. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12374519/Prevention_of_complicated_ulcer_disease_among_chronic_users_of_nonsteroidal_anti_inflammatory_drugs:_the_use_of_a_nomogram_in_cost_effectiveness_analysis_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/162/pg/2105 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -