Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

General patterns of taxonomic and biomass partitioning in extant and fossil plant communities.
Nature. 2002 Oct 10; 419(6907):610-3.Nat

Abstract

A central goal of evolutionary ecology is to identify the general features maintaining the diversity of species assemblages. Understanding the taxonomic and ecological characteristics of ecological communities provides a means to develop and test theories about the processes that regulate species coexistence and diversity. Here, using data from woody plant communities from different biogeographic regions, continents and geologic time periods, we show that the number of higher taxa is a general power-function of species richness that is significantly different from randomized assemblages. In general, we find that local communities are characterized by fewer higher taxa than would be expected by chance. The degree of taxonomic diversity is influenced by modes of dispersal and potential biotic interactions. Further, changes in local diversity are accompanied by regular changes in the partitioning of community biomass between taxa that are also described by a power function. Our results indicate that local and regional processes have consistently regulated community diversity and biomass partitioning for millions of years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA. benquist@u.arizona.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12374977

Citation

Enquist, Brian J., et al. "General Patterns of Taxonomic and Biomass Partitioning in Extant and Fossil Plant Communities." Nature, vol. 419, no. 6907, 2002, pp. 610-3.
Enquist BJ, Haskell JP, Tiffney BH. General patterns of taxonomic and biomass partitioning in extant and fossil plant communities. Nature. 2002;419(6907):610-3.
Enquist, B. J., Haskell, J. P., & Tiffney, B. H. (2002). General patterns of taxonomic and biomass partitioning in extant and fossil plant communities. Nature, 419(6907), 610-3.
Enquist BJ, Haskell JP, Tiffney BH. General Patterns of Taxonomic and Biomass Partitioning in Extant and Fossil Plant Communities. Nature. 2002 Oct 10;419(6907):610-3. PubMed PMID: 12374977.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - General patterns of taxonomic and biomass partitioning in extant and fossil plant communities. AU - Enquist,Brian J, AU - Haskell,John P, AU - Tiffney,Bruce H, PY - 2001/12/18/received PY - 2002/08/05/accepted PY - 2002/10/11/pubmed PY - 2002/11/26/medline PY - 2002/10/11/entrez SP - 610 EP - 3 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 419 IS - 6907 N2 - A central goal of evolutionary ecology is to identify the general features maintaining the diversity of species assemblages. Understanding the taxonomic and ecological characteristics of ecological communities provides a means to develop and test theories about the processes that regulate species coexistence and diversity. Here, using data from woody plant communities from different biogeographic regions, continents and geologic time periods, we show that the number of higher taxa is a general power-function of species richness that is significantly different from randomized assemblages. In general, we find that local communities are characterized by fewer higher taxa than would be expected by chance. The degree of taxonomic diversity is influenced by modes of dispersal and potential biotic interactions. Further, changes in local diversity are accompanied by regular changes in the partitioning of community biomass between taxa that are also described by a power function. Our results indicate that local and regional processes have consistently regulated community diversity and biomass partitioning for millions of years. SN - 0028-0836 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12374977/General_patterns_of_taxonomic_and_biomass_partitioning_in_extant_and_fossil_plant_communities_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01069 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -