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Metabolic bone disease is present at diagnosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2002; 16(11):1895-902AP

Abstract

AIM

To establish whether bone disease is present at diagnosis in inflammatory bowel disease and to identify contributory metabolic abnormalities.

METHODS

Newly diagnosed patients with inflammatory bowel disease (19 males, 15 females; mean age, 44 years; range, 17-79 years; 23 ulcerative colitis, 11 Crohn's disease) were compared against standard reference ranges and a control group with irritable bowel syndrome (eight males, 10 females; mean age, 40 years; range, 19-64 years). Bone mineral density (g/cm2, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: lumbar spine and femoral neck) and biochemical bone markers were measured.

RESULTS

Femoral neck bone mineral density, T- and Z-scores (mean +/- s.d., respectively) were lower in inflammatory bowel disease patients than in irritable bowel syndrome controls (0.78 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.90 +/- 0.16, P = 0.0046; - 0.88 +/- 0.92 vs. 0.12 +/- 1.17, P = 0.0018; - 0.30 +/- 0.89 vs. 0.61 +/- 1.10, P = 0.0030). Lumbar spine bone mineral density and T-scores were also significantly lower in patients than controls (0.98 +/- 0.15 vs. 1.08 +/- 0.13, P = 0.0342; - 1.05 +/- 1.39 vs. - 0.14 +/- 1.19, P = 0.0304). Compared with controls, the urinary deoxypyridinoline : creatinine ratio was increased (7.66 vs. 5.70 nmol/mmol, P = 0.0163) and serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was decreased (18.7 vs. 28.5 micro g/L, P = 0.0016); plasma osteocalcin and serum parathyroid hormone did not differ (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The bone mineral density is reduced at diagnosis, prior to corticosteroid treatment, in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Our data suggest that this is attributable to increased resorption rather than decreased bone formation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust, Kent, UK. edmund.lamb@ekht.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12390098

Citation

Lamb, E J., et al. "Metabolic Bone Disease Is Present at Diagnosis in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 16, no. 11, 2002, pp. 1895-902.
Lamb EJ, Wong T, Smith DJ, et al. Metabolic bone disease is present at diagnosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002;16(11):1895-902.
Lamb, E. J., Wong, T., Smith, D. J., Simpson, D. E., Coakley, A. J., Moniz, C., & Muller, A. F. (2002). Metabolic bone disease is present at diagnosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 16(11), pp. 1895-902.
Lamb EJ, et al. Metabolic Bone Disease Is Present at Diagnosis in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002;16(11):1895-902. PubMed PMID: 12390098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic bone disease is present at diagnosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Lamb,E J, AU - Wong,T, AU - Smith,D J, AU - Simpson,D E, AU - Coakley,A J, AU - Moniz,C, AU - Muller,A F, PY - 2002/10/23/pubmed PY - 2003/2/1/medline PY - 2002/10/23/entrez SP - 1895 EP - 902 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 16 IS - 11 N2 - AIM: To establish whether bone disease is present at diagnosis in inflammatory bowel disease and to identify contributory metabolic abnormalities. METHODS: Newly diagnosed patients with inflammatory bowel disease (19 males, 15 females; mean age, 44 years; range, 17-79 years; 23 ulcerative colitis, 11 Crohn's disease) were compared against standard reference ranges and a control group with irritable bowel syndrome (eight males, 10 females; mean age, 40 years; range, 19-64 years). Bone mineral density (g/cm2, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: lumbar spine and femoral neck) and biochemical bone markers were measured. RESULTS: Femoral neck bone mineral density, T- and Z-scores (mean +/- s.d., respectively) were lower in inflammatory bowel disease patients than in irritable bowel syndrome controls (0.78 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.90 +/- 0.16, P = 0.0046; - 0.88 +/- 0.92 vs. 0.12 +/- 1.17, P = 0.0018; - 0.30 +/- 0.89 vs. 0.61 +/- 1.10, P = 0.0030). Lumbar spine bone mineral density and T-scores were also significantly lower in patients than controls (0.98 +/- 0.15 vs. 1.08 +/- 0.13, P = 0.0342; - 1.05 +/- 1.39 vs. - 0.14 +/- 1.19, P = 0.0304). Compared with controls, the urinary deoxypyridinoline : creatinine ratio was increased (7.66 vs. 5.70 nmol/mmol, P = 0.0163) and serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was decreased (18.7 vs. 28.5 micro g/L, P = 0.0016); plasma osteocalcin and serum parathyroid hormone did not differ (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The bone mineral density is reduced at diagnosis, prior to corticosteroid treatment, in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Our data suggest that this is attributable to increased resorption rather than decreased bone formation. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12390098/Metabolic_bone_disease_is_present_at_diagnosis_in_patients_with_inflammatory_bowel_disease_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0269-2813&date=2002&volume=16&issue=11&spage=1895 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -