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Gut mucosal response to food antigens in Crohn's disease.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2002; 16(11):1903-15AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Food antigens may contribute to gut inflammation in Crohn's disease.

AIM

To assess in vivo sensitization to food antigens, ascertain whether sensitivity is gut specific, assess food sensitization in vitro, and correlate in vivo changes with histological and blood changes.

METHODS

Skin testing and rectal exposure to six food antigens (cereal, cabbage, citrus, milk, yeast and peanut) and control saline were assessed double-blind by immediate and 3.5-h laser Doppler blood flowmetry, and rectal biopsies were taken. Peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation was measured in response to the same antigens.

RESULTS

Ten patients with Crohn's disease and 10 healthy controls were studied. Blood flow increased in 24 of 60 antigen sites in Crohn's disease patients and six of 60 antigen sites in controls (P < 0.0001) after 3.5 h. The Crohn's disease group demonstrated higher rectal blood flow than controls in response to all food antigens, and this was significantly different for the responses to yeast (P = 0.036) and citrus fruits (P = 0.038). Lymphocyte proliferation occurred in 32 of 60 tests in Crohn's disease patients and eight of 60 tests in controls (P < 0.0001). There were no skin responses. Submucosal oedema corresponded to increased mucosal flow.

CONCLUSIONS

Crohn's disease patients demonstrate in vivo and in vitro sensitization to food antigens, which is gut specific. Mucosal flowmetry allows the identification of sensitization to gut antigens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

St Mark's Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12390099

Citation

Van Den Bogaerde, J, et al. "Gut Mucosal Response to Food Antigens in Crohn's Disease." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 16, no. 11, 2002, pp. 1903-15.
Van Den Bogaerde J, Cahill J, Emmanuel AV, et al. Gut mucosal response to food antigens in Crohn's disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002;16(11):1903-15.
Van Den Bogaerde, J., Cahill, J., Emmanuel, A. V., Vaizey, C. J., Talbot, I. C., Knight, S. C., & Kamm, M. A. (2002). Gut mucosal response to food antigens in Crohn's disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 16(11), pp. 1903-15.
Van Den Bogaerde J, et al. Gut Mucosal Response to Food Antigens in Crohn's Disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002;16(11):1903-15. PubMed PMID: 12390099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gut mucosal response to food antigens in Crohn's disease. AU - Van Den Bogaerde,J, AU - Cahill,J, AU - Emmanuel,A V, AU - Vaizey,C J, AU - Talbot,I C, AU - Knight,S C, AU - Kamm,M A, PY - 2002/10/23/pubmed PY - 2003/2/1/medline PY - 2002/10/23/entrez SP - 1903 EP - 15 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 16 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Food antigens may contribute to gut inflammation in Crohn's disease. AIM: To assess in vivo sensitization to food antigens, ascertain whether sensitivity is gut specific, assess food sensitization in vitro, and correlate in vivo changes with histological and blood changes. METHODS: Skin testing and rectal exposure to six food antigens (cereal, cabbage, citrus, milk, yeast and peanut) and control saline were assessed double-blind by immediate and 3.5-h laser Doppler blood flowmetry, and rectal biopsies were taken. Peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation was measured in response to the same antigens. RESULTS: Ten patients with Crohn's disease and 10 healthy controls were studied. Blood flow increased in 24 of 60 antigen sites in Crohn's disease patients and six of 60 antigen sites in controls (P < 0.0001) after 3.5 h. The Crohn's disease group demonstrated higher rectal blood flow than controls in response to all food antigens, and this was significantly different for the responses to yeast (P = 0.036) and citrus fruits (P = 0.038). Lymphocyte proliferation occurred in 32 of 60 tests in Crohn's disease patients and eight of 60 tests in controls (P < 0.0001). There were no skin responses. Submucosal oedema corresponded to increased mucosal flow. CONCLUSIONS: Crohn's disease patients demonstrate in vivo and in vitro sensitization to food antigens, which is gut specific. Mucosal flowmetry allows the identification of sensitization to gut antigens. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12390099/full_citation L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0269-2813&amp;date=2002&amp;volume=16&amp;issue=11&amp;spage=1903 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -