Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ketoprofen-induced intestinal permeability changes studied in side-by-side diffusion cells.
J Pharm Pharmacol. 2002 Oct; 54(10):1419-22.JP

Abstract

It is known that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase intestinal permeability. Increased intestinal permeability is believed to result from the opening of tight junctions because of NSAID-induced reduction of prostaglandin synthesis and/or energy-depletion. In this study, ketoprofen-induced changes in intestinal permeability were evaluated by measuring tissue electrical parameters, namely tissue electrical resistance (TER), short circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial potential difference (PD), and the transport of a paracellular marker, fluorescein, across rat jejunum in-vitro. Ketoprofen, added to the mucosal side of the tissue, decreased TER and increased fluorescein transport in a concentration-dependent manner. I(sc) values and the active transport of D-glucose were not affected at ketoprofen concentrations of less than 5 mM. Higher ketoprofen concentrations decreased I(sc) values and diminished active transport of D-glucose, while transport of fluorescein increased markedly. Similar effects on intestinal properties were observed when the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide was added to the incubation medium. The results of this study suggest that the increased intestinal permeability observed at lower ketoprofen concentrations (< 5 mM) is most probably a consequence of reduced prostaglandin tight junction control, whereas at higher concentrations, ATP depletion caused by ketoprofen seems to be the major mechanism for increased intestinal permeability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 7, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12396306

Citation

Legen, Igor, and Albin Kristl. "Ketoprofen-induced Intestinal Permeability Changes Studied in Side-by-side Diffusion Cells." The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, vol. 54, no. 10, 2002, pp. 1419-22.
Legen I, Kristl A. Ketoprofen-induced intestinal permeability changes studied in side-by-side diffusion cells. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2002;54(10):1419-22.
Legen, I., & Kristl, A. (2002). Ketoprofen-induced intestinal permeability changes studied in side-by-side diffusion cells. The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 54(10), 1419-22.
Legen I, Kristl A. Ketoprofen-induced Intestinal Permeability Changes Studied in Side-by-side Diffusion Cells. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2002;54(10):1419-22. PubMed PMID: 12396306.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ketoprofen-induced intestinal permeability changes studied in side-by-side diffusion cells. AU - Legen,Igor, AU - Kristl,Albin, PY - 2002/10/25/pubmed PY - 2003/3/12/medline PY - 2002/10/25/entrez SP - 1419 EP - 22 JF - The Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology JO - J Pharm Pharmacol VL - 54 IS - 10 N2 - It is known that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase intestinal permeability. Increased intestinal permeability is believed to result from the opening of tight junctions because of NSAID-induced reduction of prostaglandin synthesis and/or energy-depletion. In this study, ketoprofen-induced changes in intestinal permeability were evaluated by measuring tissue electrical parameters, namely tissue electrical resistance (TER), short circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial potential difference (PD), and the transport of a paracellular marker, fluorescein, across rat jejunum in-vitro. Ketoprofen, added to the mucosal side of the tissue, decreased TER and increased fluorescein transport in a concentration-dependent manner. I(sc) values and the active transport of D-glucose were not affected at ketoprofen concentrations of less than 5 mM. Higher ketoprofen concentrations decreased I(sc) values and diminished active transport of D-glucose, while transport of fluorescein increased markedly. Similar effects on intestinal properties were observed when the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide was added to the incubation medium. The results of this study suggest that the increased intestinal permeability observed at lower ketoprofen concentrations (< 5 mM) is most probably a consequence of reduced prostaglandin tight junction control, whereas at higher concentrations, ATP depletion caused by ketoprofen seems to be the major mechanism for increased intestinal permeability. SN - 0022-3573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12396306/Ketoprofen_induced_intestinal_permeability_changes_studied_in_side_by_side_diffusion_cells_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0022-3573&amp;date=2002&amp;volume=54&amp;issue=10&amp;spage=1419 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -