Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Drinking salt water enhances rehydration in horses dehydrated by frusemide administration and endurance exercise.
Equine Vet J Suppl. 2002 SepEV

Abstract

Because the primary stimulus for thirst is an increase in plasma tonicity, we hypothesised that dehydrated horses would drink a greater total volume of fluid voluntarily during the first hour of recovery when they were initially offered salt water. To test this hypothesis, bodyweight (bwt), fluid intake (FI) and [Na+] were measured in 6 Arabian horses offered 3 rehydration solutions. After dehydration was induced by frusemide administration (1 mg/kg bwt, i.v.) followed by 45 km treadmill exercise, water (W), 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl were offered, in a randomised order, during the initial 5 min after completing exercise. Horses were subsequently placed in a stall and further intake of plain water during the first hour of recovery was measured. By the end of exercise, horses lost 5.2 +/- 0.2, 5.6 +/- 0.3 and 5.7 +/- 0.2% (P>0.05) bwt and FI during the first 5 min of recovery was 10.5 +/- 0.7, 11.6 +/- 0.8 and 11.6 +/- 1.5 l (P>0.05) for W, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl, respectively. After 20 min of recovery, [Na+] had decreased with W but remained unchanged from the end exercise values for both saline solutions. During the initial hour of recovery, further water intake was 0.9 +/- 0.4, 5.0 +/- 0.5 and 6.9 +/- 0.7 l (P<0.05) for W, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl, respectively. Therefore, total FI was 11.4 +/- 0.5, 16.6 +/- 0.7 and 18.5 +/- 1.7 l (P<0.05) for W, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl, respectively, and persisting bwt loss after 60 min of recovery was greater (P<0.05) for W (3.5%) than for the 2 saline solutions (24% for 0.45% NaCl and 1.9% for 0.9% NaCl). In conclusion, providing salt water as the initial rehydration fluid maintained an elevated [Na+] and resulted in greater total FI and recovery of bwt loss during the first hour of recovery, in comparison to offering only plain water.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824-1314, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12405743

Citation

Butudom, P, et al. "Drinking Salt Water Enhances Rehydration in Horses Dehydrated By Frusemide Administration and Endurance Exercise." Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement, 2002, pp. 513-8.
Butudom P, Schott HC, Davis MW, et al. Drinking salt water enhances rehydration in horses dehydrated by frusemide administration and endurance exercise. Equine Vet J Suppl. 2002.
Butudom, P., Schott, H. C., Davis, M. W., Kobe, C. A., Nielsen, B. D., & Eberhart, S. W. (2002). Drinking salt water enhances rehydration in horses dehydrated by frusemide administration and endurance exercise. Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement, (34), 513-8.
Butudom P, et al. Drinking Salt Water Enhances Rehydration in Horses Dehydrated By Frusemide Administration and Endurance Exercise. Equine Vet J Suppl. 2002;(34)513-8. PubMed PMID: 12405743.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Drinking salt water enhances rehydration in horses dehydrated by frusemide administration and endurance exercise. AU - Butudom,P, AU - Schott,H C,2nd AU - Davis,M W, AU - Kobe,C A, AU - Nielsen,B D, AU - Eberhart,S W, PY - 2002/10/31/pubmed PY - 2003/2/27/medline PY - 2002/10/31/entrez SP - 513 EP - 8 JF - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement JO - Equine Vet J Suppl IS - 34 N2 - Because the primary stimulus for thirst is an increase in plasma tonicity, we hypothesised that dehydrated horses would drink a greater total volume of fluid voluntarily during the first hour of recovery when they were initially offered salt water. To test this hypothesis, bodyweight (bwt), fluid intake (FI) and [Na+] were measured in 6 Arabian horses offered 3 rehydration solutions. After dehydration was induced by frusemide administration (1 mg/kg bwt, i.v.) followed by 45 km treadmill exercise, water (W), 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl were offered, in a randomised order, during the initial 5 min after completing exercise. Horses were subsequently placed in a stall and further intake of plain water during the first hour of recovery was measured. By the end of exercise, horses lost 5.2 +/- 0.2, 5.6 +/- 0.3 and 5.7 +/- 0.2% (P>0.05) bwt and FI during the first 5 min of recovery was 10.5 +/- 0.7, 11.6 +/- 0.8 and 11.6 +/- 1.5 l (P>0.05) for W, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl, respectively. After 20 min of recovery, [Na+] had decreased with W but remained unchanged from the end exercise values for both saline solutions. During the initial hour of recovery, further water intake was 0.9 +/- 0.4, 5.0 +/- 0.5 and 6.9 +/- 0.7 l (P<0.05) for W, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl, respectively. Therefore, total FI was 11.4 +/- 0.5, 16.6 +/- 0.7 and 18.5 +/- 1.7 l (P<0.05) for W, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl, respectively, and persisting bwt loss after 60 min of recovery was greater (P<0.05) for W (3.5%) than for the 2 saline solutions (24% for 0.45% NaCl and 1.9% for 0.9% NaCl). In conclusion, providing salt water as the initial rehydration fluid maintained an elevated [Na+] and resulted in greater total FI and recovery of bwt loss during the first hour of recovery, in comparison to offering only plain water. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12405743/Drinking_salt_water_enhances_rehydration_in_horses_dehydrated_by_frusemide_administration_and_endurance_exercise_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dehydration.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -