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Use of complementary and alternative therapies by patients self-reporting arthritis or rheumatism: results from a nationwide canadian survey.
J Rheumatol. 2002 Nov; 29(11):2435-41.JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Arthritis or rheumatism (A/R) often leads patients to experiment with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM); we investigated the factors associated with use of CAM.

METHODS

The source of the data is the cross sectional household component of the 1996-97 National Population Health Survey of the health status and behaviors of Canadians. The survey sample is based on 66,000 persons aged 20 years and older, representing 21 million adults. Cross tabulations were used to estimate the percentage of adults with A/R who used CAM. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify those characteristics associated with the use of CAM in the year preceding the survey.

RESULTS

In 1996-97, among the 3.3 million Canadian adults aged 20 years or older who self-reported arthritis, 22% utilized CAM in the past year. CAM users tended to be younger and with higher education and household income. They reported more pain, consumed more analgesics, and tended to be more depressed. The coexistence of back or bowel disorders, cancer, sinusitis, or food allergies with arthritis was also related to CAM use. Moreover, CAM users also used more traditional health resources.

CONCLUSION

Our results indicate that patients with A/R consulting CAM providers self-report more intense symptoms than nonusers and often have other chronic conditions. They do not seem to reject the traditional health care system, but supplement it with CAM, possibly to fulfill needs insufficiently satisfied by traditional health care providers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. bruno.fautrel@psl.ap-hop-paris.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12415605

Citation

Fautrel, Bruno, et al. "Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies By Patients Self-reporting Arthritis or Rheumatism: Results From a Nationwide Canadian Survey." The Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 29, no. 11, 2002, pp. 2435-41.
Fautrel B, Adam V, St-Pierre Y, et al. Use of complementary and alternative therapies by patients self-reporting arthritis or rheumatism: results from a nationwide canadian survey. J Rheumatol. 2002;29(11):2435-41.
Fautrel, B., Adam, V., St-Pierre, Y., Joseph, L., Clarke, A. E., & Penrod, J. R. (2002). Use of complementary and alternative therapies by patients self-reporting arthritis or rheumatism: results from a nationwide canadian survey. The Journal of Rheumatology, 29(11), 2435-41.
Fautrel B, et al. Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies By Patients Self-reporting Arthritis or Rheumatism: Results From a Nationwide Canadian Survey. J Rheumatol. 2002;29(11):2435-41. PubMed PMID: 12415605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of complementary and alternative therapies by patients self-reporting arthritis or rheumatism: results from a nationwide canadian survey. AU - Fautrel,Bruno, AU - Adam,Viviane, AU - St-Pierre,Yvan, AU - Joseph,Lawrence, AU - Clarke,Ann E, AU - Penrod,John R, PY - 2002/11/5/pubmed PY - 2003/4/26/medline PY - 2002/11/5/entrez SP - 2435 EP - 41 JF - The Journal of rheumatology JO - J Rheumatol VL - 29 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Arthritis or rheumatism (A/R) often leads patients to experiment with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM); we investigated the factors associated with use of CAM. METHODS: The source of the data is the cross sectional household component of the 1996-97 National Population Health Survey of the health status and behaviors of Canadians. The survey sample is based on 66,000 persons aged 20 years and older, representing 21 million adults. Cross tabulations were used to estimate the percentage of adults with A/R who used CAM. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify those characteristics associated with the use of CAM in the year preceding the survey. RESULTS: In 1996-97, among the 3.3 million Canadian adults aged 20 years or older who self-reported arthritis, 22% utilized CAM in the past year. CAM users tended to be younger and with higher education and household income. They reported more pain, consumed more analgesics, and tended to be more depressed. The coexistence of back or bowel disorders, cancer, sinusitis, or food allergies with arthritis was also related to CAM use. Moreover, CAM users also used more traditional health resources. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that patients with A/R consulting CAM providers self-report more intense symptoms than nonusers and often have other chronic conditions. They do not seem to reject the traditional health care system, but supplement it with CAM, possibly to fulfill needs insufficiently satisfied by traditional health care providers. SN - 0315-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12415605/Use_of_complementary_and_alternative_therapies_by_patients_self_reporting_arthritis_or_rheumatism:_results_from_a_nationwide_canadian_survey_ L2 - http://www.jrheum.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12415605 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -