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The effect of creatine monohydrate supplementation on obstacle course and multiple bench press performance.
J Strength Cond Res 2002; 16(4):500-8JS

Abstract

Dietary creatine (Cr) supplementation has been shown to enhance muscular strength and endurance. This study determined the effects of Cr supplementation on performance of military training tasks. Two groups (Cr and placebo [Pl]) of 13 male soldiers each performed 3 consecutive military obstacle course runs ( approximately 3 minutes over 7 obstacles with a 2-minute rest between runs) followed by a rifle marksmanship task on 3 occasions (T(1), T(2), and T(3)), each separated by 5 days. They also completed a bench press protocol (5 sets to failure at 70% of 1 repetition maximum) and answered the Profile of Mood States questionnaire during each test session. Testing was done 3 times. No supplementation was given before T(1). Supplementation was provided using sports bars, with both groups receiving Pl bars between T(1) and T(2), whereas from T(2) to T(3) the Cr group consumed 24 g per day of Cr monohydrate in sports bars and the Pl group consumed an equal amount (kilocalories) of Pl sports bars. Creatine usage resulted in a significant (14%) increase in total bench press repetitions (p </= 0.05), but no difference between groups in obstacle course run times for the 3 runs from T(2) to T(3). Marksmanship or mood was not affected by Cr supplementation. An increase of 1.4 kg in body mass (p </= 0.005) and a 0.5% decrease in percent body fat (p </= 0.05) were observed after Cr ingestion. Creatine supplementation over 5 days improved performance during a controlled strength test but did not significantly improve military obstacle course performance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12423177

Citation

Warber, John P., et al. "The Effect of Creatine Monohydrate Supplementation On Obstacle Course and Multiple Bench Press Performance." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 16, no. 4, 2002, pp. 500-8.
Warber JP, Tharion WJ, Patton JF, et al. The effect of creatine monohydrate supplementation on obstacle course and multiple bench press performance. J Strength Cond Res. 2002;16(4):500-8.
Warber, J. P., Tharion, W. J., Patton, J. F., Champagne, C. M., Mitotti, P., & Lieberman, H. R. (2002). The effect of creatine monohydrate supplementation on obstacle course and multiple bench press performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 16(4), pp. 500-8.
Warber JP, et al. The Effect of Creatine Monohydrate Supplementation On Obstacle Course and Multiple Bench Press Performance. J Strength Cond Res. 2002;16(4):500-8. PubMed PMID: 12423177.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of creatine monohydrate supplementation on obstacle course and multiple bench press performance. AU - Warber,John P, AU - Tharion,William J, AU - Patton,John F, AU - Champagne,Catherine M, AU - Mitotti,Peter, AU - Lieberman,Harris R, PY - 2002/11/9/pubmed PY - 2003/3/19/medline PY - 2002/11/9/entrez SP - 500 EP - 8 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - Dietary creatine (Cr) supplementation has been shown to enhance muscular strength and endurance. This study determined the effects of Cr supplementation on performance of military training tasks. Two groups (Cr and placebo [Pl]) of 13 male soldiers each performed 3 consecutive military obstacle course runs ( approximately 3 minutes over 7 obstacles with a 2-minute rest between runs) followed by a rifle marksmanship task on 3 occasions (T(1), T(2), and T(3)), each separated by 5 days. They also completed a bench press protocol (5 sets to failure at 70% of 1 repetition maximum) and answered the Profile of Mood States questionnaire during each test session. Testing was done 3 times. No supplementation was given before T(1). Supplementation was provided using sports bars, with both groups receiving Pl bars between T(1) and T(2), whereas from T(2) to T(3) the Cr group consumed 24 g per day of Cr monohydrate in sports bars and the Pl group consumed an equal amount (kilocalories) of Pl sports bars. Creatine usage resulted in a significant (14%) increase in total bench press repetitions (p </= 0.05), but no difference between groups in obstacle course run times for the 3 runs from T(2) to T(3). Marksmanship or mood was not affected by Cr supplementation. An increase of 1.4 kg in body mass (p </= 0.005) and a 0.5% decrease in percent body fat (p </= 0.05) were observed after Cr ingestion. Creatine supplementation over 5 days improved performance during a controlled strength test but did not significantly improve military obstacle course performance. SN - 1064-8011 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12423177/The_effect_of_creatine_monohydrate_supplementation_on_obstacle_course_and_multiple_bench_press_performance_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=12423177.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -