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High oxidized LDL and elevated plasma homocysteine contribute to the early reduction of myocardial flow reserve in healthy adults.
Eur J Clin Invest. 2002 Nov; 32(11):795-802.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Impairment of coronary blood flow reserve has been shown to be an early manifestation of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied more closely the contribution of various risk factors on early deterioration of coronary function.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Fifty-one young, apparently healthy adults, with normal or mildly elevated serum cholesterol levels but without other major risk factors for CAD, such as diabetes or hypertension, underwent positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was measured using O15-water. In addition to the classical risk factors, the role of several new risk indicators, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, infection (Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies), and inflammation parameters (adhesion molecules, ICAM, VCAM, selectin, and C-reactive protein), homocysteine and body iron stores were investigated.

RESULTS

Elevated lipid and lipoprotein levels were not associated with reduced coronary reactivity. However, high autoantibody titers against oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were associated with 21% lower CFR than low oxLDL (P < 0.05). Furthermore, high homocysteine levels predicted low CFR (P < 0.05). The other measured parameters, Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody levels, C-reactive protein and adhesion molecule concentrations did not associate with myocardial blood flow. In a stepwise regression model, oxLDL (P = 0.03), homocysteine (P = 0.04) and triglycerides (P = 0.018) were significant predictors of CFR.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study suggests an important role for oxidized LDL and plasma homocysteine on early impairment of coronary reactivity in young adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Tampere, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12423319

Citation

Laaksonen, R, et al. "High Oxidized LDL and Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Contribute to the Early Reduction of Myocardial Flow Reserve in Healthy Adults." European Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 32, no. 11, 2002, pp. 795-802.
Laaksonen R, Janatuinen T, Vesalainen R, et al. High oxidized LDL and elevated plasma homocysteine contribute to the early reduction of myocardial flow reserve in healthy adults. Eur J Clin Invest. 2002;32(11):795-802.
Laaksonen, R., Janatuinen, T., Vesalainen, R., Lehtimäki, T., Elovaara, I., Jaakkola, O., Jokela, H., Laakso, J., Nuutila, P., Punnonen, K., Raitakari, O., Saikku, P., Salminen, K., & Knuuti, J. (2002). High oxidized LDL and elevated plasma homocysteine contribute to the early reduction of myocardial flow reserve in healthy adults. European Journal of Clinical Investigation, 32(11), 795-802.
Laaksonen R, et al. High Oxidized LDL and Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Contribute to the Early Reduction of Myocardial Flow Reserve in Healthy Adults. Eur J Clin Invest. 2002;32(11):795-802. PubMed PMID: 12423319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High oxidized LDL and elevated plasma homocysteine contribute to the early reduction of myocardial flow reserve in healthy adults. AU - Laaksonen,R, AU - Janatuinen,T, AU - Vesalainen,R, AU - Lehtimäki,T, AU - Elovaara,I, AU - Jaakkola,O, AU - Jokela,H, AU - Laakso,J, AU - Nuutila,P, AU - Punnonen,K, AU - Raitakari,O, AU - Saikku,P, AU - Salminen,K, AU - Knuuti,J, PY - 2002/11/9/pubmed PY - 2003/4/29/medline PY - 2002/11/9/entrez SP - 795 EP - 802 JF - European journal of clinical investigation JO - Eur. J. Clin. Invest. VL - 32 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Impairment of coronary blood flow reserve has been shown to be an early manifestation of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied more closely the contribution of various risk factors on early deterioration of coronary function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-one young, apparently healthy adults, with normal or mildly elevated serum cholesterol levels but without other major risk factors for CAD, such as diabetes or hypertension, underwent positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was measured using O15-water. In addition to the classical risk factors, the role of several new risk indicators, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, infection (Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies), and inflammation parameters (adhesion molecules, ICAM, VCAM, selectin, and C-reactive protein), homocysteine and body iron stores were investigated. RESULTS: Elevated lipid and lipoprotein levels were not associated with reduced coronary reactivity. However, high autoantibody titers against oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were associated with 21% lower CFR than low oxLDL (P < 0.05). Furthermore, high homocysteine levels predicted low CFR (P < 0.05). The other measured parameters, Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody levels, C-reactive protein and adhesion molecule concentrations did not associate with myocardial blood flow. In a stepwise regression model, oxLDL (P = 0.03), homocysteine (P = 0.04) and triglycerides (P = 0.018) were significant predictors of CFR. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests an important role for oxidized LDL and plasma homocysteine on early impairment of coronary reactivity in young adults. SN - 0014-2972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12423319/High_oxidized_LDL_and_elevated_plasma_homocysteine_contribute_to_the_early_reduction_of_myocardial_flow_reserve_in_healthy_adults_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0014-2972&amp;date=2002&amp;volume=32&amp;issue=11&amp;spage=795 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -