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Homocysteine and cognitive function in the elderly: the Rotterdam Scan Study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations are associated with AD and vascular dementia, but the relation with cognitive performance in nondemented elderly people is not known.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association of tHcy and cognitive function in the elderly, and assess whether this may be mediated by structural brain changes on MRI.

METHODS

The Rotterdam Scan Study is a population-based study of 1,077 nondemented elderly. Cognitive performance was assessed, and compound scores were constructed for psychomotor speed, memory function, and global cognitive function. Cerebral infarcts, white matter lesions, and generalized brain atrophy were measured on MRI. The cross-sectional relationship between tHcy levels and neuropsychological test scores was assessed by multiple regression.

RESULTS

Mean tHcy level was 11.5 micro mol/L (SD 4.1). Increasing tHcy levels were associated with lower scores for psychomotor speed, memory function, and global cognitive function, and this was largely due to the association with tHcy levels in the upper quintile (>14 micro mol/L). Adjusted differences between test scores of participants in the upper quintile as compared with the lower four quintiles of tHcy were -0.26 (95% CI: -0.37; -0.14) for psychomotor speed, -0.13 (95% CI: -0.27; 0.01) for memory function, and -0.20 (95% CI: -0.30; -0.11) for global cognitive function. These associations were not mediated by structural brain changes on MRI.

CONCLUSION

Elevated tHcy levels are associated with decreased cognitive performance in nondemented elderly people, and the relation was most marked for psychomotor speed. This association was independent of structural brain changes on MRI.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Neurology 59:9 2002 Nov 12 pg 1375-80

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aging
    Atrophy
    Brain
    Cognition
    Female
    Homocysteine
    Humans
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Prospective Studies
    Psychomotor Performance

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12427887

    Citation

    Prins, N D., et al. "Homocysteine and Cognitive Function in the Elderly: the Rotterdam Scan Study." Neurology, vol. 59, no. 9, 2002, pp. 1375-80.
    Prins ND, Den Heijer T, Hofman A, et al. Homocysteine and cognitive function in the elderly: the Rotterdam Scan Study. Neurology. 2002;59(9):1375-80.
    Prins, N. D., Den Heijer, T., Hofman, A., Koudstaal, P. J., Jolles, J., Clarke, R., & Breteler, M. M. (2002). Homocysteine and cognitive function in the elderly: the Rotterdam Scan Study. Neurology, 59(9), pp. 1375-80.
    Prins ND, et al. Homocysteine and Cognitive Function in the Elderly: the Rotterdam Scan Study. Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1375-80. PubMed PMID: 12427887.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Homocysteine and cognitive function in the elderly: the Rotterdam Scan Study. AU - Prins,N D, AU - Den Heijer,T, AU - Hofman,A, AU - Koudstaal,P J, AU - Jolles,J, AU - Clarke,R, AU - Breteler,M M B, AU - ,, PY - 2002/11/13/pubmed PY - 2002/12/10/medline PY - 2002/11/13/entrez SP - 1375 EP - 80 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 59 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations are associated with AD and vascular dementia, but the relation with cognitive performance in nondemented elderly people is not known. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of tHcy and cognitive function in the elderly, and assess whether this may be mediated by structural brain changes on MRI. METHODS: The Rotterdam Scan Study is a population-based study of 1,077 nondemented elderly. Cognitive performance was assessed, and compound scores were constructed for psychomotor speed, memory function, and global cognitive function. Cerebral infarcts, white matter lesions, and generalized brain atrophy were measured on MRI. The cross-sectional relationship between tHcy levels and neuropsychological test scores was assessed by multiple regression. RESULTS: Mean tHcy level was 11.5 micro mol/L (SD 4.1). Increasing tHcy levels were associated with lower scores for psychomotor speed, memory function, and global cognitive function, and this was largely due to the association with tHcy levels in the upper quintile (>14 micro mol/L). Adjusted differences between test scores of participants in the upper quintile as compared with the lower four quintiles of tHcy were -0.26 (95% CI: -0.37; -0.14) for psychomotor speed, -0.13 (95% CI: -0.27; 0.01) for memory function, and -0.20 (95% CI: -0.30; -0.11) for global cognitive function. These associations were not mediated by structural brain changes on MRI. CONCLUSION: Elevated tHcy levels are associated with decreased cognitive performance in nondemented elderly people, and the relation was most marked for psychomotor speed. This association was independent of structural brain changes on MRI. SN - 0028-3878 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12427887/Homocysteine_and_cognitive_function_in_the_elderly:_the_Rotterdam_Scan_Study_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12427887 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -