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Spermicides 2002: an overview.
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2002 Sep; 7(3):173-7.EJ

Abstract

The first-ever written prescription for a contraceptive (barrier method) tampon can be found in the Ebers Papyrus, a compendium of medical practices written in 1550 BC. Modern spermicides are produced in a variety of formulations, including gels, foams, creams, suppositories, pessaries, capsules, foaming tablets and films. Spermicides are relatively inexpensive and widely available over the counter. Most of the currently used spermicides contain the chemical agent (non-ionic detergent) nonoxynol-9. The spermicide 'as a commonly used method' has a very high failure rate (one pregnancy in every four women using this method of contraception for 1 year). Implementation of other, much more effective methods of contraception has made spermicides less and less popular, but recently their potential properties against HIV and STI pathogens (a cause of sexually transmitted diseases) have led to new attention for these products. These properties have been widely evaluated in clinical trials, but the final conclusion does not favor spermicides as the tool for the global fight against HIV/AIDS. There is an urgent need for the invention of a chemical product that, for dual protection, would be administered vaginally before sexual intercourse to kill HIV and other STI pathogens, and at the same time disable or kill sperm. The new era for barrier methods should begin from the development of novel microbicides.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Postgraduate Center of Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12428938

Citation

Lech, M M.. "Spermicides 2002: an Overview." The European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care : the Official Journal of the European Society of Contraception, vol. 7, no. 3, 2002, pp. 173-7.
Lech MM. Spermicides 2002: an overview. Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2002;7(3):173-7.
Lech, M. M. (2002). Spermicides 2002: an overview. The European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care : the Official Journal of the European Society of Contraception, 7(3), 173-7.
Lech MM. Spermicides 2002: an Overview. Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2002;7(3):173-7. PubMed PMID: 12428938.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Spermicides 2002: an overview. A1 - Lech,M M, PY - 2002/11/14/pubmed PY - 2003/2/22/medline PY - 2002/11/14/entrez SP - 173 EP - 7 JF - The European journal of contraception & reproductive health care : the official journal of the European Society of Contraception JO - Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - The first-ever written prescription for a contraceptive (barrier method) tampon can be found in the Ebers Papyrus, a compendium of medical practices written in 1550 BC. Modern spermicides are produced in a variety of formulations, including gels, foams, creams, suppositories, pessaries, capsules, foaming tablets and films. Spermicides are relatively inexpensive and widely available over the counter. Most of the currently used spermicides contain the chemical agent (non-ionic detergent) nonoxynol-9. The spermicide 'as a commonly used method' has a very high failure rate (one pregnancy in every four women using this method of contraception for 1 year). Implementation of other, much more effective methods of contraception has made spermicides less and less popular, but recently their potential properties against HIV and STI pathogens (a cause of sexually transmitted diseases) have led to new attention for these products. These properties have been widely evaluated in clinical trials, but the final conclusion does not favor spermicides as the tool for the global fight against HIV/AIDS. There is an urgent need for the invention of a chemical product that, for dual protection, would be administered vaginally before sexual intercourse to kill HIV and other STI pathogens, and at the same time disable or kill sperm. The new era for barrier methods should begin from the development of novel microbicides. SN - 1362-5187 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12428938/Spermicides_2002:_an_overview_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/birthcontrol.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -