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Effects of a participatory ergonomics intervention computer workshop for university students: a pilot intervention to prevent disability in tomorrow's workers.
Work. 2002; 18(3):305-14.WORK

Abstract

A participatory approach was used to create a computer ergonomics workshop for college students, incorporating an instructional systems design process and adult learning inquiry perspectives. The primary objective of this participatory ergonomic pilot intervention was to involve students throughout the training design process in solving computer workstation ergonomic problems and adopting healthy computing behaviors. Students' level of participation included becoming part of the training design team, a co-facilitator, or a student trainee. A second objective was to examine the translation of an industrial office ergonomics training program into a college computer ergonomics training program. The long term goal was to reduce upper extremity symptoms and disability. The program was piloted at one private university. The three student trainees significantly increased their knowledge of computer ergonomics from 69% of test items answered correctly pre-training to 82% post-training. Trainees were also successful in conducting computer ergonomic evaluations of students' computing work areas. They achieved 100% accuracy in identifying ergonomic problems and proposing solutions in five ergonomic workstation assessments in the field. This approach was successful in creating a sense of ownership among the student developers and facilitators as reflected in their self-reports during a post-intervention debriefing. The results of this pilot study justify formal controlled trials of this intervention in university students, who will become tomorrow's workers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Liberty Mutual Research Center for Safety and Health, Hopkinton, MA, USA. michelle.robertson@libertymutual.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12441571

Citation

Robertson, Michelle M., et al. "Effects of a Participatory Ergonomics Intervention Computer Workshop for University Students: a Pilot Intervention to Prevent Disability in Tomorrow's Workers." Work (Reading, Mass.), vol. 18, no. 3, 2002, pp. 305-14.
Robertson MM, Amick BC, Hupert N, et al. Effects of a participatory ergonomics intervention computer workshop for university students: a pilot intervention to prevent disability in tomorrow's workers. Work. 2002;18(3):305-14.
Robertson, M. M., Amick, B. C., Hupert, N., Pellerin-Dionne, M., Cha, E., & Katz, J. N. (2002). Effects of a participatory ergonomics intervention computer workshop for university students: a pilot intervention to prevent disability in tomorrow's workers. Work (Reading, Mass.), 18(3), 305-14.
Robertson MM, et al. Effects of a Participatory Ergonomics Intervention Computer Workshop for University Students: a Pilot Intervention to Prevent Disability in Tomorrow's Workers. Work. 2002;18(3):305-14. PubMed PMID: 12441571.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a participatory ergonomics intervention computer workshop for university students: a pilot intervention to prevent disability in tomorrow's workers. AU - Robertson,Michelle M, AU - Amick,Benjamin C,3rd AU - Hupert,Nathaniel, AU - Pellerin-Dionne,Mary, AU - Cha,Eugene, AU - Katz,Jeffrey N, PY - 2002/11/21/pubmed PY - 2003/1/7/medline PY - 2002/11/21/entrez SP - 305 EP - 14 JF - Work (Reading, Mass.) JO - Work VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - A participatory approach was used to create a computer ergonomics workshop for college students, incorporating an instructional systems design process and adult learning inquiry perspectives. The primary objective of this participatory ergonomic pilot intervention was to involve students throughout the training design process in solving computer workstation ergonomic problems and adopting healthy computing behaviors. Students' level of participation included becoming part of the training design team, a co-facilitator, or a student trainee. A second objective was to examine the translation of an industrial office ergonomics training program into a college computer ergonomics training program. The long term goal was to reduce upper extremity symptoms and disability. The program was piloted at one private university. The three student trainees significantly increased their knowledge of computer ergonomics from 69% of test items answered correctly pre-training to 82% post-training. Trainees were also successful in conducting computer ergonomic evaluations of students' computing work areas. They achieved 100% accuracy in identifying ergonomic problems and proposing solutions in five ergonomic workstation assessments in the field. This approach was successful in creating a sense of ownership among the student developers and facilitators as reflected in their self-reports during a post-intervention debriefing. The results of this pilot study justify formal controlled trials of this intervention in university students, who will become tomorrow's workers. SN - 1051-9815 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12441571/Effects_of_a_participatory_ergonomics_intervention_computer_workshop_for_university_students:_a_pilot_intervention_to_prevent_disability_in_tomorrow's_workers_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1051-9815&volume=18&issue=3&spage=305 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -