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Prevalence of prostatitis-like symptoms in a community based cohort of older men.
J Urol 2002; 168(6):2467-71JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We describe a community based study to estimate the prevalence of prostatitis-like symptoms using questions similar to the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI).

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Study subjects were a randomly selected sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota white men 40 to 79 years old in January 1990 who participated in a longitudinal study of lower urinary tract symptoms. Subjects were evaluated biennially using self-administered questionnaires. In 2000 questions similar to the NIH-CPSI were incorporated into the questionnaire and questionnaire responses were used to categorize men as having prostatitis-like symptoms.

RESULTS

Of 1,541 men 182 (12%) had at least 1 urogenital pain symptom. Pubic (76 men, 4.9%) and testicular (73, 4.7%) pain were the most frequent pain symptoms. A total of 34 men with prostatitis-like symptoms (2.2%) had higher mean pain (6.7 versus 0.5), urinary symptom (3.5 versus 2.1) and quality of life impact (3.7 versus 1.9) scores compared to men who did not (all p <0.001). Pain frequency (OR 39.2, 95% CI 18.8, 81.9) and pain intensity (OR 21.5, 95% CI 8.7, 52.9) were more strongly associated with prostatitis-like symptoms than urinary symptom score (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4, 5.6) or quality of life impact score (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.9, 10.7).

CONCLUSIONS

Although urogenital pain is common among community dwelling men, prostatitis-like symptoms based on the modified questions from the NIH-CPSI are less common. While pain measures may be useful in distinguishing between men with and without prostatitis-like symptoms, the urinary symptom and quality of life impact scores could partly reflect benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12441942

Citation

Roberts, Rosebud O., et al. "Prevalence of Prostatitis-like Symptoms in a Community Based Cohort of Older Men." The Journal of Urology, vol. 168, no. 6, 2002, pp. 2467-71.
Roberts RO, Jacobson DJ, Girman CJ, et al. Prevalence of prostatitis-like symptoms in a community based cohort of older men. J Urol. 2002;168(6):2467-71.
Roberts, R. O., Jacobson, D. J., Girman, C. J., Rhodes, T., Lieber, M. M., & Jacobsen, S. J. (2002). Prevalence of prostatitis-like symptoms in a community based cohort of older men. The Journal of Urology, 168(6), pp. 2467-71.
Roberts RO, et al. Prevalence of Prostatitis-like Symptoms in a Community Based Cohort of Older Men. J Urol. 2002;168(6):2467-71. PubMed PMID: 12441942.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of prostatitis-like symptoms in a community based cohort of older men. AU - Roberts,Rosebud O, AU - Jacobson,Debra J, AU - Girman,Cynthia J, AU - Rhodes,Thomas, AU - Lieber,Michael M, AU - Jacobsen,Steven J, PY - 2002/11/21/pubmed PY - 2002/12/18/medline PY - 2002/11/21/entrez SP - 2467 EP - 71 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 168 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: We describe a community based study to estimate the prevalence of prostatitis-like symptoms using questions similar to the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Study subjects were a randomly selected sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota white men 40 to 79 years old in January 1990 who participated in a longitudinal study of lower urinary tract symptoms. Subjects were evaluated biennially using self-administered questionnaires. In 2000 questions similar to the NIH-CPSI were incorporated into the questionnaire and questionnaire responses were used to categorize men as having prostatitis-like symptoms. RESULTS: Of 1,541 men 182 (12%) had at least 1 urogenital pain symptom. Pubic (76 men, 4.9%) and testicular (73, 4.7%) pain were the most frequent pain symptoms. A total of 34 men with prostatitis-like symptoms (2.2%) had higher mean pain (6.7 versus 0.5), urinary symptom (3.5 versus 2.1) and quality of life impact (3.7 versus 1.9) scores compared to men who did not (all p <0.001). Pain frequency (OR 39.2, 95% CI 18.8, 81.9) and pain intensity (OR 21.5, 95% CI 8.7, 52.9) were more strongly associated with prostatitis-like symptoms than urinary symptom score (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4, 5.6) or quality of life impact score (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.9, 10.7). CONCLUSIONS: Although urogenital pain is common among community dwelling men, prostatitis-like symptoms based on the modified questions from the NIH-CPSI are less common. While pain measures may be useful in distinguishing between men with and without prostatitis-like symptoms, the urinary symptom and quality of life impact scores could partly reflect benign prostatic hyperplasia. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12441942/Prevalence_of_prostatitis_like_symptoms_in_a_community_based_cohort_of_older_men_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1097/01.ju.0000036433.07079.ce?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -